Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: A Brief History of Biofuels, From the Civil War to Today   Next in Blog: Highland Park Plant, Birthplace of Ford’s Moving Assembly Line, Eyed for Preservation
Close
Close
Close

Cars of Futures Past: Stout Scarab

Posted July 18, 2013 8:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Concept future prototype

William Stout wasn't just an automotive engineer. In fact, the man billed as the "father of modern aviation" had a series of aeronautical credits to his name, including the first commercially available monoplane with a cantilevered, internally braced wing (known as the "Bat Wing"). Stout was also the first to promote an all-metal airplane, viewing this as a superior alternative to the stretched-fabric-over-wood-frame construction so popular in the early decades of the 20th Century. Ultimately, however, Stout thrived on taking existing designs and improving upon them, and the lessons he learned from aeronautical engineering ultimately led him to design one of the most remarkable vehicles of the 20th century: the Stout Scarab.

Read the full article here.

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: A Brief History of Biofuels, From the Civil War to Today   Next in Blog: Highland Park Plant, Birthplace of Ford’s Moving Assembly Line, Eyed for Preservation

Advertisement