Engineering News Blog

Engineering News

Latest news of interest to engineers. Sourced from GlobalSpec's Engineering News

Previous in Blog: Astronauts Took a Soyuz for a Little Fly Around the ISS, Gravity-Style   Next in Blog: Singularity Update: New Transistor Mimics The Behavior Of A Synapse
Close
Close
Close

Nanotube-Based Sensors Can Be Implanted Under the Skin for a Year

Posted November 03, 2013 3:50 PM

From Phys.org:

Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important signaling molecules in living cells, carrying messages within the brain and coordinating immune system functions. In many cancerous cells, levels are perturbed, but very little is known about how NO behaves in both healthy and cancerous cells.

Nitric oxide has contradictory roles in cancer progression, and we need new tools in order to better understand it," says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT. "Our work provides a new tool for measuring this important molecule, and potentially others, in the body itself and in real time."

Led by postdoc Nicole Iverson, Strano's lab has built a sensor that can monitor NO in living animals for more than a year. The sensors, described in the Nov. 3 issue of Nature Nanotechnology, can be implanted under the skin and used to monitor inflammation-a process that produces NO. This is the first demonstration that nanosensors could be used within the body for this extended period of time.

Read the whole article

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Astronauts Took a Soyuz for a Little Fly Around the ISS, Gravity-Style   Next in Blog: Singularity Update: New Transistor Mimics The Behavior Of A Synapse

Advertisement