Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Driving Impression: 1940 Ford Business Coupe

Posted January 26, 2015 2:00 PM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto coupe driving Ford

Note: I write up driving impressions of virtually every car I photograph within a couple of days of the drive, so everything is fresh in my memory. Occasionally, because of the constraints of format, the prepared text doesn't run in the print magazines. Now, thanks to the joys of the blogosphere and its limitless space, we can feature it here.

Slip inside, and you note the relative ease in which you can slide behind the wheel: The width across the running board isn't insurmountable, and there's terrific headroom, which helps you clamber behind the big two-spoke steering wheel.

Once you're inside, take stock of your surroundings. The narrow cabin tapers in, the further it goes, and the floor-mounted pedals are easy enough to access, if slightly awkward for anyone used to pedals that hang from behind the metal dash. The windows are strangely short, despite this being a standard, unchopped '40. The body sides are really high, the roof wraps around, the wraparound B/C-pillar is enormous, and the split-glass front and rear all contribute to feeling like there's less glass area than perhaps you'd think there should be.

Behind the wheel of one of the last pre-war autos.

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