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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Remember When Ford Had a Difficult Time finding Buyers for its GT40 Mk I Road Car?

Posted February 22, 2016 10:45 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto Ford GT40 sales

Ford's GT40 enjoyed great success as a racing car, but as a passenger car, a role required for FIA homologation, it was a failure. In order to move the 20 or so cars built for homologation purposes, Ford promoted the car with a dealer roadshow and deep discounting, eventually clearing its inventory with very little (or perhaps no) profit. On March 11, a 1966 Ford GT40 Mk I, once part of the automaker's Promotion and Disposal Program, will cross the auction block in Amelia Island, where (this time) no additional fanfare will be needed to market the car.

The Ford GT40, in its various forms, captured overall victory at Le Mans from 1966 through 1969, and won scores of other races in Europe and the United States. Race cars, however, have radically different design criteria than street cars, and in this regard the GT40 was a victim of its own success. The car's 40-inch height may have lowered the center of gravity and reduced drag, but it also resulted in the car being nearly invisible on public roads. It also made entry and exit challenging for those dressed in street clothes, and the World Registry of Cobras & GT40s, 4th Edition, describes entry and egress from the car as a "spectator event."

Surprisingly, people didn't see themselves driving this car to work everyday.

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