Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Anglia to Humvee, Roy Lunn’s Lifetime of Engineering Earns Him a Place in Automotive Hall of Fame

Posted June 28, 2016 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: automotive design GT40 le mans

To different groups of car enthusiasts, Roy Lunn represents vastly different accomplishments. There are Ford’s GT40 wins at Le Mans, for which he’s perhaps most recognized, but there’s also the Jeep XJ Cherokee, the Ford Anglia, multiple performance Mustangs, and even an Aston Martin or two in his resume. And for all that, the Automotive Hall of Fame will induct him into its ranks next month.

In some ways, Lunn was sort of Ford’s version of Zora Arkus-Duntov, a comparison directly made by the editors of Sports Car Graphic on the cover of their August 1966 issue, which featured the two advanced vehicle engineers. Both began their careers in Europe, both emphasized racing as a means of improving the breed, and both reigned during the high-horsepower glory years of their brands.

Lunn, however, had a far more varied background in the auto industry. The trained mechanical engineer and World War II Royal Air Force veteran began designing cars in 1946, first for AC, and then for Aston Martin (where he prepared a team of cars to run in the 24 Hours of Le Mans) and Jowett. His next assignment – with Ford of England, starting in 1953 – would start out far more mundane, though significant, with the development of the immensely popular Anglia.

A legendary auto designer gets his due.

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