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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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“The finest sports car the world was ever going to see,” McLaren’s F1 Celebrates its Silver Anniversary

Posted January 12, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl

It began as a conversation between McLaren’s Gordon Murray and Ron Dennis, awaiting a flight home after the 1988 Italian Grand Prix. Four years later, the company best known for building winning race cars produced a road car that Dennis, in William Taylor’s book McLaren – The Cars 1964-2008, described as “…the finest sports car the world had ever seen, but also the finest sports car the world was ever going to see.” Even today, on the eve of its 25th anniversary, the McLaren F1 remains among the most innovative and desirable supercars ever produced.

To call the McLaren team’s performance during the 1988 Formula 1 season “dominating” is something of an understatement. Of the 16 races that comprised the season, McLaren won 15, and likely would have won in Italy, too, had Alain Prost’s engine not developed a mis-fire, and had his teammate Ayrton Senna not been collected, two laps from the finish, by the Williams of Jean-Louis Schlesser. This single-race disappointment aside, McLaren was on a high after a losing 1987 season, making the idea of an ultra-high performance road car seem that much more viable.

The McLaren F1 turns old enough to rent a car...but why ever would it?

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