Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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That Old Truck: A Love-Hate Relationship with My Summer Camp’s 1.5-Ton Ford Stakebed

Posted June 21, 2019 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Ford history memories Truck

There were moments when I hated—and loved—that old truck.

It was a long time ago—64 years—and my memory is fading, but I’m almost certain it was a 1.5-ton Ford made between 1945 and 1947. I do remember it had a flathead V-8 that probably displaced 221 cubic inches and put out 85 horsepower. And jutting from the floorboard was a long gearshift rod with black knob at the end that stirred three forward gears and reverse.

It could really pull on steep grades, gears whining and complaining when its driver made hard, grinding shifts (the result of a worn clutch). It was noisy, too. A blatting muffler, clunky, rock-stiff suspension and rattling wood rails startled cows, horses, rabbits and other wildlife living along dirt roads bisecting fields lined with stone walls.

A nostalgic look at summers spent riding around Vermont in the back of war-era flatbed.

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