Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: That Old Truck: A Love-Hate Relationship with My Summer Camp’s 1.5-Ton Ford Stakebed   Next in Blog: Honda Restores a…Chevy?
Close
Close
Close

How Ford’s Flathead V-8 Helped Save Lives as an Aerial Minesweeper During World War II

Posted June 24, 2019 11:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: aerospace airplane Ford WWII

Ford’s flathead V-8 has gone on to countless uses since the company introduced it in 1932. In addition to powering cars and trucks from the factory, industrial types have fitted it to hot rods, tractors, airplanes, even air compressors. Perhaps its most beneficial use, however, seems to be its least well known: as an aerial minesweeper clearing paths for ships in the English Channel and Suez Canal during World War II.

While both the British and the Germans had developed magnetic mines prior to World War II – in 1916 and 1925, respectively – the Germans made more widescale use of the mines earlier in the war, sinking British ships as early as September 1939. While U-boats deployed some of the mines, the Luftwaffe deployed some as well, including one inadvertently left unactivated on a mud flat in late November 1939 near Shoeburyness.

As Royal Navy officers discovered upon disassembling the mine, instead of the induction methods British mines employed, the German mines used dip needle detonators that worked “on the same principle as a compass,” according to War is Boring, to detect the passing disruption in the earth’s magnetic field caused by a metallic ship.

How horsepower from a classic Ford powerplant made ships safer during WWII.

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland Ohio
Posts: 389
Good Answers: 17
#1

Re: How Ford’s Flathead V-8 Helped Save Lives as an Aerial Minesweeper During World War II

06/25/2019 7:11 AM

Looks like the US needs to pull one of these out of the closet to sweep the strait of hormuz

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: That Old Truck: A Love-Hate Relationship with My Summer Camp’s 1.5-Ton Ford Stakebed   Next in Blog: Honda Restores a…Chevy?

Advertisement