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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

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Used Car or Future Collectible? Ford’s 1984-’90 Bronco II

Posted September 04, 2019 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Bronco classic auto Ford

Today, compact SUVs and crossovers represent one of the fastest-growing vehicle segments in the United States, with consumer demand nearly doubling since 2013. That growth is all the more remarkable considering that–with exceptions like the original Ford Bronco, International Scout and Jeep Commando–the segment was generally overlooked by automakers for years, until General Motors reinvigorated it with the launch of the Chevrolet S-10 Blazer and the GMC S-15 Jimmy for the 1983 model year.

Ford, which hadn’t produced a compact utility vehicle since the Bronco was super-sized in 1978, saw the potential for such a fuel-efficient, do-it-all vehicle as well. Dearborn’s offering, dubbed the Bronco II, was introduced to the market in 1983 as a 1984 model. Like the GM equivalents, the Bronco II’s roots came from a compact pickup truck, the Ford Ranger, which shortened the model’s development time and ensured its durability. Early models (which came only with four-wheel-drive drivetrains) were marketed for their go-anywhere capability, and not for their creature comforts; it wasn’t until 1986 that Ford even offered the Bronco II in rear-wheel drive, targeted to buyers who liked the appeal of a compact SUV but didn’t need its off-road capability.

A new Bronco is on the way, but we are talking the old ones today.

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