Elasto Proxy's Sealing Solutions Blog Blog

Elasto Proxy's Sealing Solutions Blog

Elasto Proxy's Sealing Solutions Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about the design and manufacturing of rubber and plastic parts and products. In addition to regular content from Elasto Proxy, you'll hear from companies across the rubber and plastics industry.

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Rubber Trim Seals for Edge Protection

Posted June 21, 2020 10:51 AM by Doug Sharpe

Rubber trim protects edges and the people who come into contact with them. Typically, edge trim is used to cover the sheet metal surfaces found on machinery or equipment. Because these surfaces may be sharp or rough, they can pose a cutting hazard to employees who reach through a door or hatch, or who brush up against the edge of a stainless steel table. Rubber trim is also used to enhance the appearance of edges and comes in custom colors that can complement your larger product designs.

Unlike other industrial rubber products, edge trim does not provide sealing action. There isn’t a bulb that compresses to fill a gap; however, rubber trim can provide environmental resistance depending on the material you select. Also, although the trim “rubber trim” is used widely, trim for edge protection is often made of a plastic called polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or a group of copolymers called thermoplastic elastomers (TPE). That’s why this article covers these two materials as well as EPDM, neoprene, and silicone trim.

If you need edge trim for industrial or commercial applications, start by determining the size of the gap you need to cover. Typically, the gap is the size of the flange or the gauge of the steel. Most rubber trim is black, but some materials come in colors such as red, blue, yellow, or green. You’ll also need to select the right rubber compound while accounting for cutting and installation as part of your decision making process. The following sections explain.

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