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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

Posted May 20, 2021 3:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: electric vehicles F150 Ford

Why it took until this week for Ford to announce its pending electric pickup truck would resurrect the Lightning name is a mind-boggler. After all, it's a perfect fit not only for an EV in general but specifically for a company that has already produced high-performance pickups using that very name in an era now growing popular among collectors - even if those pickups did have to burn a lot of hydrocarbons to achieve that performance. The Lightning debuted in 1993, along with Ford's Special Vehicles Team high-performance skunkworks, the successor to Ford's Special Vehicle Operations program, which aimed to produce not just halo versions of existing vehicles, but also vehicles with substantially improved performance. For the first Lightning, developed under John Plant, that meant following the basic hot rod script: less weight, bigger engine. The SVT engineers, looking to one-up Chevrolet's 454 SS just then wrapping up its three-year run, chose to base the Lightning on the lightest-possible full-size Ford pickup, the regular-cab short-bed two-wheel-drive F-150, and installed the 351 Windsor V-8, at the time the standard engine in the F-250 and F-350...

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Re: Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

05/20/2021 11:59 AM

It will be interesting to see how and where Ford markets the new Lightning. I'm trying to imagine what an EV-350 with duallies is going to look like. Maybe the owners will have extra batteries under the tool box in the bed?

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Re: Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

05/20/2021 12:49 PM

The batteries weight 1800 lbs by themselves...

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Re: Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

05/21/2021 12:10 PM

. . . I guess I am not surprised by that number. What this shows is that this truck is more of a statement than a function.

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Re: Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

05/22/2021 5:12 AM

Some 6500 lbs total....the Hummer is over 9000 lbs...crikey you're going to need 15" wide tires to stop properly....otherwise you'll set off the anti-lock breaking system every time you try to stop....LOL

The towing capacity of the Lightning is 7700 lbs, it can barely pull it's own weight...better make sure you have electric braking on that trailer I'm thinking...

https://www.theverge.com/2021/5/20/22445725/ford-f150-lightning-ev-truck-specs-cybertruck-hummer-rivian

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Re: Watch: The Ford F-150 Lightning EV is Coming. Here’s a Look at its Gas-powered Predecessors

05/23/2021 3:42 AM

How is towing capacity determined?

..."Road & Track contributor Jason Fenske visited Fiat Chrysler's Chelsea Proving Grounds in Michigan to see what goes into the set of tests known as SAE J2807, the certification process for vehicle tow rating. The truck used in Fenske's demonstration is a new Ram Heavy Duty, complete with a dually rear end and a 6.7-liter turbo-diesel Cummins straight-six making 1000 lb-ft of torque. For each test, the truck must be towing the maximum load recommended by the manufacturer, meaning this Ram is pulling just under 40,000 pounds.

The acceleration test requires single-wheel trucks to do 0-30 mph in 12 seconds, 0-60 mph in 30 seconds, and 40-60 mph in 18 seconds; those times increase to 14, 35, and 21 seconds, respectively, for dually models. Those times might sound like an eternity in the car world, but for a vehicle pulling the equivalent of 16 new Miatas, it's not bad. The truck must be able to brake from 20 mph to zero in 45 feet with trailer brakes, or 80 feet without.

In terms of handling, the truck needs to be able to maintain understeer as it accelerates on a circular skid pad from 0.1 g to 0.3 g of lateral acceleration. This ensures the truck won't lose control of its rear end (and therefore the trailer) during hard cornering scenarios. In a quick direction-change sway test, the trailer must remain stable and secure without excessive oscillation.

The final test is called the Highway Grade / Davis Dam test, which wasn't performed in Fenske's video. It requires that the truck be able to tow its maximum trailer weight up a specific 11.4-mile uphill stretch of road in Arizona. For this test to be run correctly, it must be at least 100 degrees Fahrenheit outside, and the air conditioning must be on its maximum setting using outside air. The truck must maintain a minimum speed of 40 mph (35 mph for a dually), and it can't throw any error codes or burn any fluids during the test."...

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a29339668/how-truck-tow-rating-is-calculated/

500 ft elevation to 3500 ft in 11.4 miles...that's about a 5% grade...not much of a real world test...

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