Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Can a Hydraulic Flaring Tool Take the Hassle Out of Making and Repairing Brake Lines?

Posted August 25, 2021 5:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: brakes hydraulics Tools

If only all brake lines ran to the four corners of the car without threading over, under, around and through every chassis component between master cylinder and brake caliper. If only brake lines could make do with a simple compression fitting like the kitchen faucet. If only the carmakers made sure to leave enough room around steering linkages, leaf springs and exhaust hangers to keep from scraping the flesh from your knuckles every time you had to repair and re-flare a brake line.

But then again, if it were easy, would we really be able to brag so loudly about our auto repair and restoration conquests to our car buddies? Maybe not, but some of us aren't doing this for bragging rights.

So for that reason, we were intrigued when Jim O'Clair recently dropped by the Sibley Shop at Hemmings Headquarters with a NAPA hydraulic in-line flaring tool kit. We've spent decades using the old bar- and clamp-type flaring tool kits, trying to get the angle of the clamp just right while on our backs under a car with zero clearance, usually to disappointing results. So it wouldn't hurt to see if this kit offers a better method.

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