Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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I Went to Retrace the Ronin Chase Scene in France's Cote d'Azur but Found Old Car Bliss Instead

Posted September 22, 2021 5:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic cars Performance cars

“Come back to the States,” Junkyard Digs said. “It’ll be a blast.” I couldn’t wait. It turned out I would have to. The U.S. border remained closed to travelers from Britain. I couldn’t go west, so I turned south. Two hours of flying later, I landed in Nice on the French Riviera. This bottom corner of France, tucked between the mountains and the Mediterranean, is known as the Cote d’Azur, and it's bursting with automotive gold. I had a long weekend, a tight budget, and a crazy plan to seek out vintage metal, exotic moderns, a legendary racetrack, and an epic car chase.

Working my way across town, the August heat soon exposed me as an interloper from more northern climes. I sought refuge on the shaded side of the street and lingered at junctions where a cross draft brought respite. Cafe tables cluttered the sidewalk, interspersed by cars and scooters parked with breathtaking insouciance to city ordnance. Many of them were bona fide beaters that would make a seasoned New Yorker blush. Among them I found humble French classics, Citroëns, and Renault 4s and 5s living out their last days in the sun. A Peugeot 304 cabriolet, elegant in its simplicity, looked so right sitting patiently outside a bakery store, just as a Grand Wagoneer does outside a Vermont cabin.

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