Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: Open Diff: What Automotive Innovations Never Had a Chance?   Next in Blog: Are iPhones the Easier, Cheaper Alternative to Scanning Car Parts for 3D Printing?
Close
Close
Close

Hemmings Cinema: Manx Resorter, Mustang versus Aston, DUKW, DIY rivets

Posted February 24, 2022 4:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Exotics shelby

We present a potpourri of different videos for your perusal.

The late Bruce Meyers is perhaps best known for his Beetle-based Manx, but he also produced a number of other variants, including the Manx SR, the Tow'd, and the little-known Resorter (before returning to dune buggies years later to produce the Manxsters and Kick-Outs). The latter has become highly collectible, as Randy Carlson noted in this Carchaeology video on a recently restored Resorter.

In the days just after the Monte Carlo Rally in either 1965 or 1966, Ford paired a Shelby G.T.350 with an Aston-Martin DB5 for a "Goldfinger-style chase" over the Col de Turini for a five-minute promo video:

Not all GMC DUKWs have been turned into Duck Boats, as Winslow Bent noted in a recent episode of "This Old Truck," featuring the DUKW that his father purchased 50 years ago:

The restorer at Gasolini continues to work on his scratch built etceterini, and in the latest episode shows how he DIY'd the rivets that he used to mount one of the aluminum panels and how he set those rivets so flush to the panel that they became totally invisible afterward.

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Open Diff: What Automotive Innovations Never Had a Chance?   Next in Blog: Are iPhones the Easier, Cheaper Alternative to Scanning Car Parts for 3D Printing?

Advertisement