Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: Carspotting: Akron, Ohio, 1988   Next in Blog: Could an Obscure Fifties Fiberglass Roadster Have Been the First Electric Car Inspired by Nikola Tesla?
Close
Close
Close

This May Be the Most Versatile Automotive Nameplate in History

Posted April 21, 2022 5:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Lancer Mitsubishi

Evolutionary biologists have a term, carcinization, to describe a recurring theme in convergent evolution in which multiple unrelated species eventually evolve into crab-like animals. "Everything turns to crab," as the memes go. The Japanese automaker Mitsubishi has a similar phenomenon in which seemingly every product it puts out, regardless of the products' original nameplates, eventually becomes a Colt. With the announcement of yet another iteration of the Mitsubishi Colt this week, it's worth reviewing just how many times the triple-diamond has returned to that well over the last several decades.

The Colt name, as it turns out, not only pre-dates Mitsubishi Motors in its current form but also Mitsubishi Motors's corporate predecessor. Introduced in 1962 by Shin Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (one of the three splinter companies that re-formed into Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in 1964), that first Colt, the Colt 600 two-door sedan, used a rear-mounted air-cooled engine (a two-stroke twin) driving the rear wheels in the tradition of many people's cars. Unlike other people's cars around the world, however, it wouldn't remain in that configuration for long, remaining on the market only through 1965.

Confusingly, two different Colt lines succeeded the Colt 600. The first, another Shin Mitsubishi Heavy Industries product, the larger A20 Colt 1000, debuted in 1963 and sold concurrently with the Colt 600. With a 977-cc, four-stroke, water-cooled, overhead-valve inline-four-cylinder engine, it had a more traditional front-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout and came in both four-door sedan and two-door van configurations. Over the next several years, the Colt 1000 spawned a few different variations, including the A21 Colt 1100, the A23 New Colt 1200, the A25 Colt 1500, and the A27 New Colt 1500, all with larger engines and slightly different styling, but the same basic chassis.

Keep reading...

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Carspotting: Akron, Ohio, 1988   Next in Blog: Could an Obscure Fifties Fiberglass Roadster Have Been the First Electric Car Inspired by Nikola Tesla?

Advertisement