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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Open Diff: How Would You Revive Your Favorite Make or Model?

Posted May 26, 2022 5:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: chevrolet classic cars Safari

seems not a week can go by without news of another defunct car brand rising from the dead. Last week, Volkswagen announced the Scout name is returning; this week, it's Moskvitch making another run. There's a new Bronco, a new Hummer and a new Grand Wagoneer on dealer lots now. Trans Am Worldwide, the company building new Firebirds out of modern Camaros, recently revealed its new (Camaro-based) Chevelle-ish car. Mitsubishi has even given the Colt another chance.

This is not a new phenomenon, of course. Plenty of car brands and models have risen from the dead, some more successful than others. Bugatti's still going strong, Stutz had a 25-year run in its second incarnation, and for now we still have revived Camaros and Challengers. Sometimes these revivals remain close to their roots, and sometimes they stray a good distance to adapt to a changed and changing new car market. In every case, though, these revivals are banking on some magic - or at the very least name recognition - still residing in that old trademark.

With all of the revivals springing up these days, it's almost a wonder that there are any good automotive brand names or models still unused since the beginning of the retro era, but a quick look through any catalog shows that, indeed, there are plenty. For instance, back in 2010, Casey Shain dreamed up a return of the Eagle brand using the above pickup-ified Jeep Compass, figuring that FCA would have had better success creating a Jeep sub-brand to market all the cute utes that shouldn't have been sold as Jeeps. What better name than Eagle, which FCA - and now Stellantis - presumably still owns the rights to and which historically was associated with all-wheel-drive cars?

Me, I'd bring back the Chevrolet S-10 and GMC S-15. Yes, I know the Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon replaced it, so in a way the S-10 is still in production, but the Colorado has bloated up like your high-school classmates at the 25th anniversary reunion to the point that it's no longer classified as a compact pickup. It's easy to argue that bloat is just part and parcel of the pickup landscape these days, but as Ford has shown with the Maverick, not every pickup has to tow massive fifth-wheel campers or look like it was designed by somebody who just finished a 53-hour Call of Duty marathon. Instead, there's still a market for compact pickups capable of light hauling, decent fuel mileage, and fitting in a suburban garage.

How about you? What long-gone make or model deserves a comeback? We're not talking low-production replica cars here, rather an adaptation of a bygone nameplate to fit into today's market. And how would you give that revival a fighting chance among all the other revivals now clawing for market share? Let us know in the comments below.

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