Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: High Gas Prices Got You Down? Here’s How to Enjoy Collector Cars and Not Dread the Pump   Next in Blog: A Dozen Orphan-Brand Vehicles We’d Love to Park in Our Garages
Close
Close
Close
2 comments

How and When Does a Vehicle Transition from a Used Car to an Accepted Collectible?

Posted June 29, 2022 5:00 AM by dstrohl

Owning a modern-classic vehicle is both rewarding and challenging. Rewarding because you have a car or truck you can use and enjoy with no compromise in everyday comfort, performance or safety. Challenging since it may not yet be broadly accepted (and appraised by valuation experts, insurance companies and aftermarket parts suppliers) as a vehicle of sufficient monetary or cultural worth to preserve.

This first-world problem is very familiar to the RADwood crowd owning 1980s-circa Y2K vehicles. There are many widely acknowledged and highly valued cars and trucks from that era, including the Acura NSX, Buick GNX and 993-generation Porsche 911. Still, the majority of "ordinary" vehicles, even outliers that may boast low production or special features, haven't widely registered as collectible.

I own a couple of cars that fall into that category, including my beloved C70, now 22 years young. Pricey when new, this car represented a low-volume specialty product for Volvo, and it was even more niche in high-pressure turbo, manual transmission coupe trim, one of 603 so spec'd and imported.

This car has been on three-season duty since 2007 in an attempt to preserve it for posterity. I've made a habit of checking the book values when I bring it out of hibernation each spring, and it's always an exercise in frustration. Today the top retail price on a C70 Coupe is well under $4,000. Convertible versions survive the coupes by a ratio of about 10:1, it seems, with soft-tops making the majority of recorded sales. I know there's no way I could replace my car, in its current form and condition, for that paltry sum. Indeed, I almost doubt I could replace it at all, since very few coupes (especially 5-speeds!) have survived in good, enthusiast-owned care.

Read on for more...

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - Wannabeabettawelda

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Annapolis, Maryland
Posts: 7222
Good Answers: 416
#1

Re: How and When Does a Vehicle Transition from a Used Car to an Accepted Collectible?

06/29/2022 1:13 PM

Collectible?

Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 22721
Good Answers: 411
#2

Re: How and When Does a Vehicle Transition from a Used Car to an Accepted Collectible?

06/30/2022 2:09 PM

It depends on the level of a collectible,… I think it comes down to demand,…

like this one, there isn’t as much demand as a collectible.

__________________
“ When people get what they want, they are often surprised when they get what they deserve " - James Wood
Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 2 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: High Gas Prices Got You Down? Here’s How to Enjoy Collector Cars and Not Dread the Pump   Next in Blog: A Dozen Orphan-Brand Vehicles We’d Love to Park in Our Garages

Advertisement