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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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We've Been Teased with the Return of the Hornet Name Before. Will it Actually Happen This Time?

Posted July 05, 2022 5:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Hudson Hornet

In 2006, DaimlerChrysler generated a hive's worth of buzz and many other groan-worthy insect puns when it debuted a subcompact concept car at the Geneva Motor Show. With its aggressive stance, extensively reconfigurable interior, and blue-tinted glass, the concept itself was intriguing enough for a boxy, upright, front-wheel-drive five-door, but what really had every car journalist talking was the name, Hornet, which had surfaced from the German-American carmaker's vast repository of heritage nameplates, this time under the Dodge brand. Sixteen years later, it now appears Chrysler product planners have greenlit the Hornet nameplate for production, though as a CUV with little in common with its Hudson and AMC namesakes.

As it first appeared in 1951, the Hornet name stood for performance. Hudson introduced the Hornet largely as a platform for the company's new H-145 engine, a high-compression flathead 308-cu.in. six-cylinder good for 145 horsepower, more than the eight-cylinder engine that powered the Commodore. (The now-famous Twin-H dual-carburetor setup — initially available only as a dealer option before Hudson made it a factory option in early 1952 — bumped output to 160 horsepower.) Not only did the Hornet prove an immediate success on the sales floor with a full selection of coupe, sedan, convertible, and even Hollywood hardtop body styles, it also lit up the stock car circuit with drivers like Marshall Teague, Herb Thomas, Tim Flock and Dick Rathmann campaigning the Hornet in NASCAR.

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