TechnoTourist’s Engineering Expeditions Blog

TechnoTourist’s Engineering Expeditions

Want to travel the world, but don't have time to leave the office? TechnoTourist is here to save the day! Tag along while TechnoTourist visits famous engineering feats around the world. TechnoTourist will also investigate fascinating technologies that help to preserve and discover incredible travel locations. Maybe you could use TechnoTourist's insights to help you plan your next travel itinerary, or escape from the stresses of everyday life!

Previous in Blog: Yellowstone National Park Has Its Own Grand Canyon (Part 3)   Next in Blog: Making Work Easier – Hancock Shaker Village (Part 1)
Close
Close
Close
3 comments

Cathedral Peaks at Grand Teton National Park (Part 4)

Posted October 27, 2008 12:01 AM by SavvyExacta

Portrayed as the most majestic mountains of the Rockies, Wyoming's Grand Teton range is as impressive as people say. So read along as Techno Tourist takes you on a scenic tour of Grand Teton National Park. As we go, we'll take a virtual tour of the Grand Tetons, where the largest peaks are known as the Cathedral Group.

America's Youngest Mountains?
The Tetons were formed as pressure deep within the mantle of the Earth caused a split along a fault line. In the west, a block rose and formed the Grand Teton mountain range. In the east, a block sank and formed the popular valley known as Jackson Hole. Although the granite summits of the Tetons' peaks are over three billion years old (some of the oldest in North America), these mountains are the youngest of the Rockies at just 12 million years. This is evident by their rugged, dynamic contrast to the landscape. Their siblings are even older, however, with a ripe old age of 60-million years.

Features of the Park
Spanning 309,995 acres, Grand Teton National Park is smaller than Yellowstone but still has plenty to see. Ample wildlife roams the park. So do cattle, on the eastern boundary, where the land is shared by neighboring ranches. You can even see an 1880s log home that once belong to the Cunningham family, one of the area's original settlers. Although the Cunninghams had a nice view (the Tetons can be seen right out their old window), the winters must have been challenging since there were few modern comforts and the family lived so far from civilization.

There are a few lakes in Grand Teton National Park. The largest and most popular are Jackson Lake and Jenny Lake. Jackson Lake is a beautiful place to fish, boat, look for wildlife, or simply enjoy a meal at one of the waterfront restaurants. It also has a concrete and earth-fill dam from which the Snake River emerges. First dammed in 1906, the river provides water for storage, mainly for potato farmers in Idaho. Today's dam is said to be able to withstand a maximum magnitude of 7.5 on the Teton fault line.

I also drove to the top of Signal Mountain for a sweeping view of the lake, Teton range, and Jackson Hole basin. You can see everything from this summit! It was truly amazing to see what the forces of nature had left behind. Apart from being atop a skyscraper (or some smaller mountains back home), I'd never truly appreciated how small I am in the grand scheme of things. This place really gives you that experience – and is impossible to forget.

Editor's Note: Can you spot the heron on the abandoned beaver lodge?

Resources:

http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/grand-teton-national-park-ga2.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Lake_Dam

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16510
Good Answers: 668
#1

Re: Cathedral Peaks at Grand Teton National Park (Part 4)

10/27/2008 4:59 AM

Looks beautiful...
I can't understand why people in the UK spend money they can't afford to go all the way to the USA to see Disney land when they could see something like this.

(Don't let those damned Creationists hear you say it's that old)

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Anonymous Poster
#2

Re: Cathedral Peaks at Grand Teton National Park (Part 4)

10/31/2008 6:59 AM

A prime example of tilted fault block ...for any geology buffs in here.

Reply
Guru
United States - Member - Lifelong New Yorker Popular Science - Biology - Animal Science Technical Fields - Technical Writing - Technical Writer

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 2313
Good Answers: 59
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Cathedral Peaks at Grand Teton National Park (Part 4)

10/31/2008 7:41 AM

Thanks for providing the terminology, Guest! The "big picture" really provides the overview. You can sort of see what I mean by "combining" two of my photos. The bottom left photo is looking toward the east from the top of a mountain. The second photo from the bottom right is taken from the same vantage point looking west. Beautiful bowl vs. jutting beauty!

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 3 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Anonymous Poster (1); Del the cat (1); SavvyExacta (1)

Previous in Blog: Yellowstone National Park Has Its Own Grand Canyon (Part 3)   Next in Blog: Making Work Easier – Hancock Shaker Village (Part 1)

Advertisement