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Anonymous Poster #1

Is it Load Bearing?

03/12/2018 1:13 PM

Hey guys,

I'm sure you get this question constantly. Hopefully this will be an easier one. I removed all of the drywall. Can I remove everything to the inside (center of the house) of the 3 2x4s slapped together?

?

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#1

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 1:31 PM

In general, if the wall runs perpendicular to the floor joists of the story above, it is likely to be load bearing especially if it is in the 'middle' of the house.

If the wall runs parallel the floor joists, then the wall is probably not load bearing.

The best thing to do is to find the builder so they can check the prints.

How big are the floor joists of the story above? 2x12's? What would be the span of the floor joists above? If you tell us that the span would run from the front of the house to the back, it's time to talk to an architect.

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#2

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 2:54 PM

That one post of three boards combined together implies to me load bearing. A framing carpenter would not use that much lumber in a small space unless it was going to take a load.

Removing structural members is not a safe task for any amateur. Consult with a local structural engineer/architect and/or your local building inspector.

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#5
In reply to #2

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 3:45 PM

Yeah, I know that cant be removed. There's a header on top of it for the door archway.

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#11
In reply to #5

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 4:45 AM

That needs to be told to Anonymous Poster #1, really.

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#3

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 3:10 PM

That would depend on the Structural Engineer's assessment and will be detailed on the calculation documents submitted to the local authority in pursuit of Planning and Building Regulation approval and monitoring of the works by that body. It is extremely unlikely that any reader at CR4 has access to those documents other than the Original Poster.

Anything <...Can...> be done provided it is done in the right way, which is why a Structural Engineer is usually engaged in advance of work taking place to produce those documents so that the right way can happen; it is usually money well spent.

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#6
In reply to #3

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 3:45 PM
  • If a structural failure occurs as a result of an error in a Structural Engineer's assessment document, or in a Builder's failure to follow it, then a Client has redress in Civil Law in most jurisdictions
  • If a structural failure occurs as a result of advice from anonymous posters in CR4, then it matters not a jot.
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#4

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 3:35 PM

Magic 8 ball says that "all signs point to yes".

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#7

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 3:53 PM

What's upstairs?

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/12/2018 4:34 PM

Do you want to come upstairs?

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#9

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 12:34 AM

There are assumptions of a second storey which may or may not be correct.

The triple stud is a bit of an indication of load bearing as a double would have otherwise been sufficient for just a support for the door header. The size of that header beam also suggests load bearing for something up top.

I feel that the double top plates are the most significant indicator that the wall is load bearing.

If only single storey, then perhaps a bit of in ceiling inspection will give you a better idea of what's what, and that could be fairly easy to circumvent.

If two storey, then you would need to be far more careful as, even if there are no walls directly above, there may well be flooring structure junctions over that wall, the double top plates do indicate some form of load bearing.

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#12
In reply to #9

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 8:17 AM

Thanks! This is by far the most thorough response. I'll have a structural engineer check the attic upstairs and then hopefully they'll be able to tell me what to do.

There is a second floor, though that area is over a crawl space attic. I was wondering about the double top plates.

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#13
In reply to #12

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 8:42 AM

<...Structural Engineer...>

It is always better to engage this sort of person before work starts and not part the way through.

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#10

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 2:40 AM

I would say that in the first picture, the vertical studs are not load bearing, as there is no diagonal brace tying them together. That is unless you feel that drywall has the strength to prevent lateral movement along the horizontal plane.

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#14

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 1:24 PM

See if the ceiling board passes over the top of the wall, if it does the wall isn't load bearing, another check is to look at the floor boards in the room above, If they run front to back the joists are 90degrees to the boards so you can work out if the wall is carrying the load or not.

Bazzer

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#15

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 3:42 PM

The visible portion of the lintel over the hallway-type opening below is much heavier than would be required for a simple doorway, and therefore indicates that the lintelled portion is load-bearing. That is, a load-bearing wall is indicated above the lintel, and could exist on either side of the column consisting of 3-4x4's... or both...

Treat it as load-bearing, until a structural assessment says otherwise, then be safe and treat it as load-bearing, anyway...

And then, ask a licensed Structural Engineer if (he/she/they) would sign for a new, engineered, lintel to be safely be installed under a portion of one side of the column, or the other, with appropriate columnar support provided at both ends of it...

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#16

Re: Is it load bearing?

03/13/2018 3:57 PM

In the first and second pictures I can see out a far window at the end of the room indicating the wall is roughly running down the center of the home.

If there are supports below this wall. a header beam may be your solution above.

Best

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