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Guru

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Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/29/2007 12:02 PM

My favorite TV channel (the History Channel) is airing a program called Modern Marvels that is highlighting flight as it has evolved to the extremes from the X-1 series

The crescendo is th US F-22 Raptor fighter jet. This thing is amazing itself. But, what I have found far more interesting is the R&D (previously classified) that sounded strangely familiar. For the last 2-3 decades the govt including NASA has been working with thrust vectoring and hypersonic aircraft. The F-15 was the first highly successful aircraft that could employ this technology.

The aircraft would travel at high speed and make absolute directional changes and quickly return to mach speeds. The video shows these maneuvers up close. The aircraft uses afterburners which have a high visibility from a distance, say, the ground.

What one would see on the ground is a bright light racing across the sky. Then a sudden slowing. A near 90 degree turn and then an abrupt return to mach.

Sound familiar?

The F-22 does not have visible afterburners but employs the same technology giving a slightly different appearance to ground based observers.

The program also speaks about the 2 protos that crashed. They employed an adhered linoleum type radar absorbing material.

X-1

X-33

UFOs in Iraq

F-15

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Guru

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#1

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/29/2007 9:26 PM

The incorporation of both supersonic cruise, and thrust vectoring, represent an inherent hurdle for human cockpit piloting: super high G's, intolerable by human physique.

That's probably why it was so often stated that the F-35 is likely the last fighter to be piloted by on-board pilot.

Boeing's new line, represented by the likes of X-45, X-46, X-50 mark not only the possible future research of Boeing's military aviation, but very likely the future of military aviation as such.

Having lost the X-35 competition to Lockheed Martin, Boeing tries to plan ahead, although Skunkworks are not likely to sit idle.

It was mentioned however, that Lockheed Martin had to win the X-35 or cease to exist financially, so the U.S government chose their model (later to become F-35) if only not to loose their engineering capability, off-the-map.

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Guru

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/29/2007 9:39 PM

The idea of small localized anti gravity concepts seem to be of interest here. You remember the floating frog at the university of Florida. Also some of the other super conductors/insulators having a gravity dampening effect. I am not so quick to remove the human equation from future flight technologies. If you have not seen the F-22 videos they are awesome. I can't find any F-35 aerial maneuverability videos that impress me as much as the F-22.

Also, if the pilot were to slow to the max tolerable speed and tack near 90 degree or 180 for that matter, and then return to top speed, it would most certainly appear as fast, hover, 90, fast, hover disappear to a ground based observer.

cr3

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Guru

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#3

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/29/2007 9:47 PM

Wikipedia had no pics of the X-46, so here goes (from French and Czech sources):

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Guru

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#4
In reply to #2

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/29/2007 9:54 PM

Super Conduction Magnetic Levitation (floating-frog or otherwise), is in no way shape or form Anti-Gravity as such.

It simply confines the Ferrotite (iron-content) in the animal's blood to a pre-determined, bowl-shaped field.

Just a humble, trivial note.

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#5

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/30/2007 4:15 AM

I agree that the F-22 is an awesome plane capable of exceptional maneuverablility beyond that of static thrust planes. While the ability to vector the thrust under computer control along with some pretty slick aerodynamics allows these planes and their predecessors to perform tighter turns, quicker climbs and descents below Mach, am I correct in assuming that you guys may be suggesting that these manuevers probably explain away the vast majority of ufo sightings....?

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Guru

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

09/30/2007 11:02 AM

I believe that there are a majority of sightings that can be explained by such. Especially when one accounts the R&D timeline to the high level increase from ground based observers.

I am more interested in the Ancient Sumerian, Assyrian, Egyptian and Greek (as well as other) accounts as well as thought put forth by the scientific community. I do not wish to suggest that there are no such things as UFO's, as there seems to clearly be. However, there is much this does explain. Remember this is declassified technology. Classified still exists. If one takes the time to research the technology of this aircraft alone, and I mean research, it is self evident and, in my humble opinion, free from argument that there is a tremendous correlation between sightings and these machines.

cr3

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: Thrust vectoring and hypersonic speeds.

10/01/2007 3:32 AM

Hi cr3

I was not here yesterday so I'm sorry I didn't reply before this.

I can see where someone might consider a "sighting" of this aircraft to be a possible unexplained aerial phenomenon (ufo) because of its capabilities as well as those of the skilled pilots who fly them especially if sighted at a long distance. And I agree that a large portion of supposed ufo sightings can probably be explained in this way.

But one of 2 problems I have with that is noise. Any aircraft capable of super-sonic flight makes a lot of noise. Engine noise....sonic booms moving to MACH (unless a way has been found to dampen that noise). The other being the apparent ability to make 90 degree turns at speeds exceeding 4000 mph or the ability to accelerate from a hover to extraordinary speeds seemingly in an instant again without making any noise.

Is our current (unsung) technology so good that we have figured out how to counteract gravity and inertia, especially in atmosphere, so our aircraft can perform such astonishing feats without killing the pilot or destroying the aircraft?

If so...I want to be the first one in line for a ticket to ride. I'll sell everything I possess for That thrill! LOL

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