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Join Date: Apr 2008
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Jerry McG

04/16/2008 7:56 PM

According to one reply I can implement a circuit, 10/2 w g and 30 amp breaker, wired for 220 to run three 1500 watt 110V heaters. How do I wire three receptacles to do this? Do I connect two receptacles to one leg of the 220 and one other receptacle to the other leg? Or should I simply wire one 110 receptacle on each leg for two heaters? Can use 20 amp, 110 volt receptacles if I stick with using only one leg of the 220 cable? Many thanks.

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#1

Re: Jerry McG

04/16/2008 9:39 PM

According to one reply I can implement a circuit, 10/2 w g and 30 amp breaker, wired for 220 to run three 1500 watt 110V heaters.

No, 10/3 with at least a 50 amp breaker is required depending upon the distance involved. Use a sub panel, bring the 10/3 in as the 220v main and split to the buss bar for 115v breakers, if your local codes will allow it.

108v,110v,115v,120v and 125 volt are all lumped into the 115 volt category.

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#2

Re: Jerry McG

04/16/2008 10:26 PM

"According to one reply I can implement a circuit, 10/2 w g and 30 amp breaker, wired for 220 to run three 1500 watt 110V heaters."

You can't run 110 volt heaters on a 10/2 wire w g connected to 220 volts because you can't use the ground (shield) wire as a return.

You have two choices. If you only want only one breaker, then you need a 50 amp breaker and 6AWG wire wired for 110 volts. If you can use two breakers, then use 10/3 w ground. Use two 30 amp breakers wired for 110 volts. Most distribution panels alternate breaker positions so that adjacent breakers come from opposite sides of the 220 volts if you are concerned about balancing the load. Wire the red (+) and white (-) to one duplex receptacle and the black(+) and white(-) to another. Then you can plug in the three heaters. The bare wire connects to the shield (green) screw on the receptacles.

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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Jerry McG

04/17/2008 9:48 AM

Be careful if you are going to feed a 10/3 cable from a 50 amp breaker, its not a good idea unless permitted by the code in your region (I doubt it). As a rule of thumb, a 10/3 copper 90 degree cable is good for 30 amps.

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