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Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 5:55 PM

I want to install a pipe line from my creek for garden irrigation. The creek is approximately 200 metres away and the lift from the creek is about 3 metres. I will need to place my pump at the delivery end because of electricity constraints. Is it possible to suck water over this distance as opposed to pushing it and if so what sort of pump/valves would I need? Thanks

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#1

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 6:19 PM

To get better answers, start with better questions.

How much water do you want? How much pressure do you want? These questions will drive the answer to the capacity of the pump question. Then decide what power supply you will use. Voltage? Phases? At this point you will have to look at the performance curves of the pumps that fit your above needs.

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#2

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 7:04 PM

Hello GeoffP

You will need to establish what quantity and pressure of delivered water you require.

Use a Self-priming pump - see diagrams at left, please.

Read about the self-priming pump - with diagrams, here: http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/12-html/12-12.htm

You haven't listed your Location or Country, (You easily do that in your Member Profile, then it auto-updates through all Topics and Posts you made), so I cannot advise a local supplier for you.

You could look for a supplier here: http://flow-control.globalspec.com/LearnMore/Flow_Control_Flow_Transfer/Pumps/Self_Priming_Pumps

Trust that assists you.

Kind Regards....

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#3

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 7:06 PM

Groffp; usually 30 feet, how high above sea level are you? a jet type pump will do much higher, or like the oil well pumps a lift type hundreds od feet. perry

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 7:31 PM

Hello perry

While the theoretical maximum "suction" lift for fresh water is 32 feet, in practice it is somewhat less.

The practical vertical lift for a non-self-priming pump with fresh water, is normally regarded as 26 vertical feet maximum, because of losses and efficiency.

Kind Regards....

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#5

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 7:58 PM

According to the Barometer reading that fluctuates between 13 and 16 PSI you would have to have a Pressure Drop for that distance of less than 10 PSI and that would only leave 3-6 PSI to accelerate and move the water and raise it the 9+ Feet noted..

Not likely to even come close.

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#6

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/22/2008 10:22 PM

Thanks for the quick replies. I understand about the limitations on lift it's the actual distance over land, which is relatively even, that I'm not sure about. I would be using 38mm poly pipe. I guess I would also need a one way valve at the draw off point. I'll update my profile, I live in East Coast Australia. Thanks again

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 7:22 PM

head loss for distance over land depends on pipe size and material as well as flow velocity. You might ask you pipe manufacturer what the loss is per foot of pipe.

The loss ends up looking like an elevation change, but I think a 200 meter horizontal run of 38 mm poly pipe won't have much loss.

As said before it all depends on required flow rate and pressure...

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#8

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 10:52 PM

i think that your restriction of putting the pump at the delivery end is shortsighted. i have run low power long distances without problems. if you had high tech stuff, or high energy needs, then no. but, a simple cheap pump, no problem. i have run 12v dc 200 feet before, with good results. running 110v ac is simple. also, can you set a solar panel close to the creek. after all, you only need to pump the water up about 15 feet into a tank, then let it gravity feed to your garden. that can be done with cheap scavenger pumps. if it was me, i would just buy some heavy guage 100 ft extension cords and a cheap ac pump. you are lucky, here where i am on solar, i have to pump my water up about 80 feet. my solar panel cost me $700. my low power (90watt 24vdc) pump cost me $700. the power cord from the panel to the pump cost me $100. with a cheap pump and extension cords, you could probably do it for around $100. the worst would be that the life of the pump might be a little less. just start with a cheap one and it doesn't matter. mostly though, just come out of the creek and go up and let it flow down hill to the garden. i would put a small collector tank at the end of the shorthose from the creek. then use a bottom drain on the tank, and let gravity take care of the rest. instead of having to push the water 200 feet.

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#9

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 10:56 PM

200 meters (~650 feet in real money) of SO cable will probably be cheaper and easier to run than the pipe.

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#10

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 11:12 PM

My dear friend you should refer to Pump manufacturers technical specifications for net positive suction head and pump impeller details that will answer your question after you calculate number of bends,foot valve and length of pipe and vertical distance between your pumps in let and depth at which your suction pipe ends in the water.if you need detailed calculations e-mail your id i shall gladly send you a sample calculations.

crm

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#11
In reply to #8

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 11:14 PM

sorry, i miss read the distance. 200 meters not 200 feet. by the way are you sure that you only need 3 meters of head?

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#12
In reply to #9

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/23/2008 11:25 PM

But he will still need the pipe.

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#13
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Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 12:14 AM

Did you get out of bed the wrong side. Question is perfectly understood by me

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#14

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 1:05 AM

No problem doing what you want to do. A basic centrifugal reticulation pump will do the job. The 2.2hp Davey springs to mind. I'd suggest that your 38mm poly is probably a bit small, unless you're using a baby pump. Piping losses on the suction side are much more "expensive" than on the pressure side. As far as I can remember, the standard roll of 38mm poly is 150m and 50mm (internal) is 100m so you're still going to need a join whichever way you go. I mention this because joins on the suction side can be a source of problems. I'd consider 50mm (internal) the minimum for the pump mentioned above but I'd double check with the pump manufacturer to be sure.

You also need a non return valve. I'd suggest locating this at the creek end under water. Some sort of screen to keep rubbish out of the valve (and your sprinklers) and you should be in business. You'll have to manually fill the whole shooting match up with water because it won't self prime but providing the pump is located lower than the outlets you won't have to do it again. If you do, you have a leak and you'll now see the benefit of having the non return in the creek. Any leak can be found!

Totally based on gut feeling, I'd suggest you'd get a flow of around 100 l/m from the above arrangement but if anyone wants to do the sums I'm happy to be proved wrong.

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#15
In reply to #6

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 1:19 AM

Geoffp, If you want a reasonably accurate response you have to answer the question of volume flow required. To give you a vague idea of straight run length resistance; a 40mm ID new steel pipe will have a pressure drop of about 2 m water column per 100 m at 3 m3/hr. At 5 m3/hr it will be closer to 6 m WC. At 1 m3/hr it will be around 0.3 m/100m. To this loss you must add the losses for bends, valves and fittings and take into account the NPSH required by the pump. My guess is that anywhere above about 3 m3/hr you would start getting into trouble, but not enough info to be sure.

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#16

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 5:38 AM

Remember that anyone's creek is also someone else's creek; and the what is pumped from a creek also flows back to the creek...carrying anything suspended or dissolved in it. So be sure not to damage the creek by misuse of fertilizers, pesticides, etc. Also, you might be well advise to consult local riparian regulations for your use of "your creek's" water...and regarding impacts of pumping on creek fauna. That way you can plan for sustainable gardening...not one that might be closed down before harvest.

Just a thought for your consideration.

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#17
In reply to #16

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:34 AM

This guest must be from the UK, only someone from the UK would refer to "riparian regulations."

In the Americas, Canada, and Australia we have never even heard of riparian....

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#18
In reply to #17

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:46 AM

Hello Steve S.

The term "riparian" is in use in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and parts of the US.

It is more about Common-Law rights than Statutory Rights.

There are still some really odd Laws still valid, in the US and elsewhere.

Kind Regards....

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#19

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 8:17 AM

200 meters of SO cable to place your pump at or very near the supply is the best option.

  • 1/2 hp ac pump/motor
  • Good quality foot valve (check on the suction inlet)
  • PVC pipe

Either way you need to install an electric circuit. By going the extra distance with the pump circuit you will eliminate many problems down the road, even if you were to use a self priming pump its case does not have enough volume to overcome 200 meters. I realize that the check valve close to the suction would cure this problem on paper, but the valve will fail or become fouled sooner or later then you'll have 200 meters of dry pipe to prime

Actually, since this is just for irrigation around your place, here is a good dependable and cheep option:

Place a sump pump in something like a 5 gallon bucket with loads of 1/2" holes drilled all over the sides (100-200 holes).

Run garden hose and extension cords to the pump that is submerged in your water supply.

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#20
In reply to #19

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 8:58 AM

"...you'll have 200 meters of dry pipe to prime..."

Which is why artbyjoe solved that problem already - pump the water a short distance to a tank and let it gravity feed thru the pipe to the garden out of the tank. Simple. Adds the cost of siting a tank, but cures lots of future maintenance hassles.

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#21
In reply to #20

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 9:20 AM

"Which is why artbyjoe solved that problem already - pump the water a short distance to a tank and let it gravity feed thru the pipe to the garden out of the tank. Simple. Adds the cost of siting a tank, but cures lots of future maintenance hassles."

The cost and trouble of installing the tank in excess of 10 feet above ground along with concrete base etc. to accommodate the weight of the tank and support structure and water, I assume would not be insignificant unless the holding tank were very small indeed. Gravity feed would drain the tank very slowly unless it was well above the outlet point. I think putting the pump close to the source of water and piping to the irrigation point is the best course of action for the least amount of future headaches.

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#22
In reply to #12

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 10:06 AM

Having worked on small volume systems to supply water in rural villages without electricity, I would raise the question of whether an approach of using a small portable diesel drive centrifugal pump to be the prime mover might be more cost effective. Such pumps use very little fuel and can easily develop the head required for these jobs. The pump could be located near the water source or carried to same. The water could then be discharged into a head tank to feed the irrigation system, which hopefully is a good "drip" irrigation system. {I am assuming that the original poster wants to locate the pump as close to the discharge as possible to minimize the use of electrical extensions.}

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#23
In reply to #21

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 11:05 AM

Maybe so, but I think he's gonna want a tank of some size in the system somewhere. As an overflow control (in case he can't get the pump shut off in time), as a back-up reserve (in times when the pump is down for repair but water is still needed), as a better distribution method, something. If this is for a garden, the flood irrigation method is not as effective as a drip system, and for that, he'll need a tank.

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#24

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 11:07 AM

Have you thought of bringing the water to your suction pipe instead of your pipe to the water?I ask this as I have worked with pumps of all types for 40 years for a living.Long suctions are the most troublesome and normally the most expensive way to go with a fluid system.This is why they are avoided whenever possible.

I am 63.The following have been and still are common ways of watering stock and gardens in areas of the USA.In many types of soil,you can wash a 1 1/4 to 2 inch PVC or steel pipe water well down with a garden hose plus driving down to 20 feet,or even drive a 1 1/4 inch steel pipe water well by using heavy pipe,couplings and cap along with a sledge hammer.Use a wood block cushion on top of the pipe.They can be drove to 12 feet in sandy soil.A "well point" is sold for such.In the right type of soil,your water table may be 4-6 foot due to natural hydraulics from the creek.We often have areas of "Hard Pan",clay or compacted soil where this does not work and a well has to have "Surface ares" in the water table as water slowly seeps into the well through such soil.You normally have hit water water when your well washing water quits washing soil back out the top of your pipe.

Pipe wells can be Gravel packed for better flow.Simply pump out about a a wash tub or large wheel barrow full of dirt or sand and pour the same amount of clean round pea sized gravel down the pipe.This keeps it from caving in and slows the water speed by spreading it over a larger area under ground.You suck up less dirt and have less chance of cave in.

I have dug shallow wells manually with shovels,post hole diggers along with tractor driven augers.Just be sure to SHORE up as you go or it may cave in on you with you in it.NEVER go over 3 feet without doing this for safety reasons as your soil may or may not hold!

Besides putting down farming and stock wells with my grandfather,I worked 2 years with a commercial well driller for 2 years drilling wells to 12 inches and over 500 feet.I hope this may be of help to someone.alfred

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#25

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 1:50 PM

How much suck could a good pump suck if a good pump could suck wood!

I am very sorry, I just had to.

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#26
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Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 2:49 PM

"I just had to."

No, you didn't...

Thankfully this isn't Groundhog Day, so we shouldn't have to worry about re-living this moment over and over.

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#27
In reply to #21

more ideas

09/24/2008 4:01 PM

hello mechtech,

let me clarify what i meant by a tank. i did not mean a large tank. i meant a vary small tank. small enough to hang in a tree. just something so that the water from the pump goes up 15 feet then falls into something. then a larger diameter drain than the inlet hose. so, that the water will gravity feed. i was just trying to seperate the 200 meters of hose or pipe from the pump, to reduce its requirements. that little head height could be done with the smallest pumps available, down to 1/40th of a horsepower. think aquarium recirculating pumps, or decorative fountain recirculating pumps. small scavenger pumps would be perfect. he could put a large diameter, low height tank at the garden, so that the system could pump all of the time the power is on , and he could tap the large tank when ever he wanted to water the garden.

i have also seen (online) small paddle wheel water pumps set up on a float. you float this in the middle of the creek. tie off to both sides of the creek. then the moving water turns the paddle wheel, pumping the water. no energy required. also, what is the fall of the creek. could he just go up creek 20 or 30 feet in elevation and put a hose in the creek and the other end in his garden. once you get a syphon going this alos requires no energy.

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#28

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 6:09 PM

Had to do some experiments before responding.

Also on East coast Aus. I live "off system" and thus have own water supply for house and gardens.

I have two "identical pumps" (sequential serial numbers of the same model from the same supplier at the same rating.)

One is used from the water tanks at the house, pulling through 4m of 38mm polly. Delivery after 4m of 12mm pipe is 20L in 28seconds. (Tank head when I did the measurement was 2.1m above the pump inlet.)

The other is pulling 480m through 38mm polly, steady state delivery after 4m of 12mm pipe is 20L in 78 seconds. (water source is 0.25 m above pump inlet.)

Best case for your situation, you will get reduced flow representative of the increased effort the pump has to do to lift and draw the water to its inlet.

There will be a point where the effect of lifting 3m plus the drag through the pipe will create cavitation inside the pump and you will not get anywhere.

Yes, you do need a "footvalve" to stop back flow and debris from entering the pipe. (The effort to open that also represents another restriction to flow.) It's also good practice to have a non-return valve at the inlet to the pump so if there is a leak in your plumbing, it doesn't draw back from your delivery side.

Using suction has huge inefficiency in energy usage and amount of water delivered.

Now to suggestions. I presume that you are semi rural if you have 200m from a creek to your usage site. If your usage is intermittant, then build a small pump shed near the creek, get a 15 amp outlet installed at your house and run caravan cables to the pump when you wish to use it. (This will also help you to check the footvalve is in the water and all else is OK before you start.)

If the intention is more permanent in operation, then consider installing a "sub-main" from your power source to the creek. (Our shearing shed was more than 1km from the meter box at the house. It's easy to get done.) You will need a small switchboard at the pump site, obviously needs an electrician to install and sign off.

Which river system are you in? I'd be interested in giving you a hand if it's close by.

One final word in this response. Access rights for "stock and domestic" water in Australia do have some written laws concerning how much water you can take and what it can be used for. Basically, if you make commercial gain from the water, you need to obtain an irrigators liscence to extract water. (So if you sell vegetables that you grow, or flowers or if you irrigate pasture to feed stock, or if you charge admission for people to look at your wonderful garden, you need to get a liscence.) Water for stock to drink is OK, water for your home garden is OK, water for household use is OK. Some councils will also require controls for run-off to NOT contaminate waterways.

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#29
In reply to #28

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:25 PM

That wasn't just a good answer, that was an excellent answer!

Now the question in my mind is this; would you under any circumstance use the word "riparian" as and adjective to describe the water laws you discussed in your post.

If an Australian would use such a word, then I will stand corrected by Sparky in his previous post. I can assure you that Americans do not...

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#30
In reply to #29

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:29 PM

"riparian"

in the US, far left eco people use it when discussing protecting watersheds.

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#31
In reply to #30

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:30 PM

Ok, Ok, now find me a Texan who uses it....

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#32
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Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2008 7:44 PM

I've got to admit that until around four years ago "riparian" was a foreign word to me, but since I've made some applications for "reparation of the riparian zone" of my creek frontage the word is now entrenched into my vocabulary.

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#33

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 2:18 AM

Ok everyone thanks for all the replys. Most were really helpful and will give me lots to ponder over. My initial enquiry was wether or not this project was possible and hence my lack of information on types of pump,desired flow rates etc. I live in North Eastern NSW and my creek eventually flows into the Richmond/Wilson River area. I am interested in the pipe bore approach and may consider a few well aimed sledge hammer blows before investing in a pump! Riparian relates to the banks of water courses which includes vegetation and fauna...my pumping of a little garden water would have next to no impact on the riverbank ecosystem...look at Marom Creek on google earth if you are concerned. Anyway thanks again for the info ...maybe we should start a thread on pipe bores????

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#34
In reply to #17

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 2:55 AM

and a nod.

Also from Calif, even Texas...where the term is also in currency...or was.

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#35

Re: Over what distance should a fella hafta walk to make a pump suck?

09/25/2008 3:29 AM

Within the collapse resistance of the conduit, horizontal distance is not a practical factor ... and 3 metres is not that much to lift. Given the small flow rate needed/preferable for a garden, I would expect that an impeller rated 350(+)GPH would suffice.

Your main concern seems to be with pump priming and a possible reluctance to walk 400 metres down and back, to and from the creek? If that's the case, and if you're running water conduit anyway, why not just run a second conduit at the same time to power the pump near the stream? Pipe doesn't cost much, wires not so cheap (but neither is gardening...), plus a lot quieter having the pump 200 metres away from the switch and the garden.

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#36
In reply to #31

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 5:08 AM

Ha ha! You expect CR4 to resolve that one for you, too? When even the people in Texas can't decide what a "Texan" really is? ...other than a person who walks into a tavern and asks for "Chevis 'n water"; or requests a "Core's draw"? Then there's that other Lone Star locution...about cats & chickens and guy's & gal's g-------a!

Now, if that doesn't placate you, what will?

Atypical Texan talk:

http://www.metafilter.com/52662/When-in-Texas

http://texaswater.tamu.edu/waterlaw.texas.htm

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/WW/gyw1.html

www.ucowr.siu.edu/updates/pdf/v85_a2.pdf

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#37
In reply to #30

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 5:34 AM

Informed Californians use it because:

  • The state's agriculture is crucial to the state and to the nation.
  • The state's greater portion of fresh water is drawn/impounded from rivers.
  • The Sierra Nevada snow pack that supplies California riverine systems is declining.
  • The Colorado River is increasingly in trouble.
  • The Delta which supplies the California aqueduct is in a state of crisis.
  • The wild and fishery-hatched salmon runs are in such decline (total collapse, in fact) that all commercial harvesting has been suspended.
  • The population has been growing at an unsustainable rate.

What more need be said?

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#38
In reply to #31

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 8:22 AM

We professional biologists use it all the time. So does the TDEQ (formerly TRNCC) in TX. But I agree it is uncommon otherwise...

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#39
In reply to #38

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 9:51 AM

OK, OK, OK, OK I stand completely corrected...... From all sides of the world.....

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#40

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 11:15 AM

You are aware of the basic problem so no need to explain that much. Suction side cavitation is what you are trying to avoid.

You can get head loss for pipe length data out of the machinery's handbook or off the web. Based on not having looked it up myself, cause that's your job you should be fine with this.

If you make a little sump, hole in the ground below the water for your intake that will help. You will probably want to screen the intake. Use a large one so it won't plug. If you can make a bell on the end of the intake that helps a lot.

No sharp corners. They cause major pressure drops.

You should not need much of a pump to do the job but you will definitely want the self priming type discussed by others and you will usually want to manually prime the pump on first start up and put in a check valve in the system to keep the pipe full between runs.

If you can expand the capacity of the fluid reservoir on the self-priming pump that can really help. If you have significant problems with cavitation slow down the pump's speed by adding a pulley and belt to the pump drive.

If you can find a check valve that has good flow/very little pressure drop that would be good. Normally you would install the check valve on the intake side, but it will function fine on the outlet side as long as the pump seal integrity is perfect and there are no other leaks. Putting it on the outlet side means no problem creating pressure drop on the intake side.

Larger pipe helps as you will see when you look up the pressure drop flow data online or in a reference, but my seat of the pants says you'll be fine.

Sincerely,

Mr. Gee

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#41
In reply to #40

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 2:02 PM

another great answer from Mr Gee. keep it up.

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#42
In reply to #17

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 5:27 PM

In the land of Oz, at least in the state of New South Wales, we have regulations about riparian corridors. These are the vegetated banks of a water way.

The other states are catching up in their environmental consciousness.

BAB

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#43

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2008 11:54 PM

You might just have to "Suck It & See..."

I probably shouldn't have said that should I

Sapper

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#44

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 4:46 PM

How much muck could a sump pump suck if a sump pump could suck muck?

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#45
In reply to #44

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 4:56 PM

Dunno - but I'd bet a rather largish sum that somebody here has an equation that would express the answer!

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#46
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Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 4:59 PM

I logged in...for that!?

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#47
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Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 5:02 PM

Looks like!

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#48
In reply to #46

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 5:02 PM

Lucky devil, you!

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#49
In reply to #47

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 5:11 PM

Okay then. But shouldn't you be outside in your wading boots, cleaning up something?

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#50
In reply to #49

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/26/2008 5:14 PM

Yes, the backyard is still quite a mess after Ike.

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#51

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/29/2008 6:03 AM

Hello GeoffP.

Do you have data for the strata underneath and around your garden? I suspect that the creek system that you are on has a sand seam in the alluvial levels. You may be able to get a well dug very easily near the garden if the water table is only 3m down.

Get some 2m diameter re-inforced concrete pipe (about 7m of it) and hire a backhoe to dig a hole, insert and joint the pipes so you have a 2m diameter vertical hole and backfill the surround.

Once the pipes are in place, break through at the level where the water is present and then the well will fill from that seam.

You then have a well that you can put a submersible into for your garden. (The reason for the extra depth is so that you have a reserve of water even if you do pump faster than the inflow.)

Much less hassle with footvalves, pipes overland (hot water) and the inefficiency of the distance involved. Also easier to handle during the occasional floods in that district.

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#52

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/29/2008 12:31 PM

Hi Geoff - I might be able to get you a deal on a nice diesel pump - here's one of ours pushing water around 7,000 feet linear and 500 feet of lift... :-)

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#53
In reply to #44

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/29/2008 3:16 PM

PLEASE!! enough sucking already, run a wire to a pump and push it

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#54
In reply to #22

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

06/09/2010 8:07 AM

I would suggest consulting online with Koby Zucker. He is an expert on irrigation systems and all related equipment. You can see his site and contact him: www.irrigationglobal.com

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#55

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

06/12/2010 8:30 PM

Thanks to all those that have answered my enquiry. I solved my problem the cowards way . I had a bore drilled near my barn. Good potable water was found at 33 metres at a flow rate of 60,000 litres per day. the cost was AUD5200 plus pump etc AUD1200. It's way more water than I need and due to good old La Nina we haven't had to rely on it since it was installed. Thanks again for the replys.

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#56
In reply to #48

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/24/2012 10:59 PM

Man is capable of infinite self-delusion. The word suck has no validity, except to describe an action that really does not happen in the real world. To move something you have to push it. (keep it simple) Horses don't suck the wagon along. They push it. Gravity doesn't suck. It pushes.

Think you can be "objective" about this. It's not possible to be objective. It is just another word we delude ourselves with.

I "taught" School for many years. Teacher is just another one of our words that we use to fool ourselves and others. Nobody ever taught anybody anything. Most of what you know you learned for yourself. You may have been helped but the bottom line is you either learned it or you didn't.

"Suck" on that for a while. (Tee Hee)

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#57
In reply to #56

Re: Over what distance can a pump suck?

09/25/2012 10:02 PM

Before I was married, there was this girl that had a wonderful technique for lowering pressure.

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