WoW Blog (Woman of the Week) Blog

WoW Blog (Woman of the Week)

Each week this blog will feature a prominent woman who made significant contributions to engineering or science. If you have any women you'd like us to feature please let us know and we'll do our best to include them.

Do you know of a great woman in engineering that should be recognized? Let us know! Submit a few paragraphs about that person and we'll add her to the blog. Please provide a citation for the material that you submit so that we can verify it. Please note - it has to be original material. We cannot publish copywritten material or bulk text taken from books or other sites (including Wikipedia).

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Women Inventors - Part 1

Posted July 23, 2007 6:00 AM by julie
Pathfinder Tags: inventions women inventors

This is the first in a multi-part series about women inventors. Each week, a group of women will be featured along with their inventions. If you'd like to know more about a specific inventor, please post a comment and let us know. We'll try to write follow-up feature articles for those women inventors who generate the most interest.

Disposable Cell Phone - Randice-Lisa Altschul received a series of patents for the first disposable cell phone, trademarked the Phone-Card-Phone®, in November of 1999.

Fireplace Damper - Little is known about Virgie Ammons, the inventor of a fireplace damper, other than that she was an African-American woman from West Virginia.

Windshield Wiper - Mary Anderson's goal was to improve a driver's vision during stormy weather. Her invention could clean snow, rain, or sleet from a windshield by using a handle inside the car. Another woman, Charlotte Bridgwood, invented the automatic windshield wiper.

Enhancing Images By Using Radioactive Materials - Barbara Askins invented a better method for developing astronomical and geological pictures taken by researchers. Uses of this method eventually included improvements in X-ray technology and the restoration of old pictures.

Method for Removing Cataract Lenses- Dr Patricia Bath was the first African-American woman to receive a patent for a medical invention. Her laser device made the procedure more accurate.

Gong and Signal Chair - Miriam Benjamin invented a chair which allowed hotel guests to summon wait staff. She was the second African-American woman to receive a patent.

Fire Resistant Building Material - Patricia Billings developed a material she called Geobond, a durable additive that prevents plaster-works from falling and shattering. When mixed with gypsum and concrete, the resulting compound makes an extremely durable and fire-resistant plaster.

Self-Feeding Device for AmputeesBessie Blount, a physical therapist who worked with soldiers injured in World War II, was inspired to develop a device that allowed amputees to feed themselves.

Ironing Board ImprovementSarah Boone, an African American woman, invented a device to aid in ironing the sleeves and bodies of ladies' garments.

Antifungal Antibiotic – Two women, Rachel Fuller Brown and Elizabeth Lee Hazen, invented the world's first antifungal antibiotic: nystatin.

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United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Biomedical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2
#1

Re: Women Inventors - Part 1

07/25/2007 11:29 AM

Julie,

This is a great idea for a series of posts - very informative and inspirational!

It is just amazing to me that men, who consider themselves such excellent drivers, were one-upped by these two women! Just goes to further prove to me who really are the better drivers - those of us interested in actually seeing the road.

JeannieDee

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Women Inventors - Part 1

07/25/2007 7:28 PM

Jeannie, seeing the whole road is way overrated. I don't worry about it. On a cold frosty morning, I just scrape a little patch on my windshield and I'm good to go. I figure if some guy can drive an Abrams tank thru a forest at 50mph looking out a little slot, I can certainly drive down a paved road. Plus I drive faster when looking out a scraped patch. I figure that it's better with a narrowed field of vision because for anything approaching laterally from farther out to the side, you get by it before it gets to you anyway. So you don't need to see much to the side if you drive faster.

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Participant
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Biomedical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Women Inventors - Part 1

07/26/2007 9:23 PM

Ahh, I see!

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