Roger's Equations Blog

Roger's Equations

This blog is all about science and technology (with occasional math thrown in for fun). The goal of this blog is to try and pass on the sense of excitement and wonder I feel when I read about these topics. I hope you enjoy the posts.

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Quantum Cooling to Near Absolute Zero

Posted November 16, 2015 8:23 AM by Bayes

How Cold Can They Go?

Earlier this year, the record for coldest temperature achieved in a lab was broken by Stanford, who reached a temperature of 50 picoKelvin (50 trillionths of a kelvin).
Stanford Temperature Record

Using Quantum Mechanics to cool Helium

Although records are always interesting, sometimes techniques to improve an existing cooling method can be fascinating as well. In the video below, a Professor does a great job explaining how his group uses quantum mechanical tricks to cool liquid helium much further than you would normally expect.

Liquid Helium Cooling

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Join Date: Apr 2010
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Re: Quantum Cooling to Near Absolute Zero

11/17/2015 3:16 PM

Dang, that's cold!

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