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Engineering360: "Micro-reactor developer gains access to nuclear fuel supply"

02/19/2020 12:44 PM

Read Engineering360 article: Micro-reactor developer gains access to nuclear fuel supply.

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Power-User

Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 103
Good Answers: 1
#1

Re: Micro-reactor developer gains access to nuclear fuel supply

02/28/2020 9:49 AM

I am for anything that will help reduce the extremely large nuclear waste piles.

The idea of smaller reactors to support remote and communities is a good start to reducing the overall grid another benefit.

I still much prefer renewable energy sources these reactors are far better than fossil fuels and coal.

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Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 209
Good Answers: 10
#3
In reply to #1

Re: Micro-reactor developer gains access to nuclear fuel supply

04/28/2022 5:26 PM

There is so much reactor waste lying around from the beginning of the industry (about 53,000 cubic yards) that it takes 5 hours for U. S. coal-fired power plants to produce the same volume of un-recyclable waste. The coal waste produced annually includes 1500-2000 tons of toxic heavy metals - far more than the mass of the nuclear reactor waste produced annually.

The waste disposal issues of wind and solar power are not trivial either. Photovoltaic cell production involves huge amounts of toxic chemicals, and the resin used to make wind turbine blades isn't exactly nice stuff either. Disposal of deteriorated PV panels and worn-out turbine blades is also problematic.

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Participant

Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 1
#2

Re: Micro-reactor developer gains access to nuclear fuel supply

02/28/2020 5:26 PM

These "micro" or "mini" SMRs represent a significant step towards a reliable, renewable, "green" energy source. There would be no need to limit use to remote communities - these reactors could provide power where needed, when needed to towns, cities, large industrial sites/factories, mining operations, etc. If constructed underground they could be hardened and secure power centers. Other benefits (in addition to cleaning up nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel) would be reduced need for extensive transmission towers and lines; plus an eventual reduced cost per kw/h electricity.

I question the purpose of the solar panels on the concept illustration.

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