User Profile for sabo
Name: sabo
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Join Date: 01/03/2007
Member Title: Associate
Last Visit: 04/01/2007 12:11 AM
Last Post Date: 03/25/2007 12:09 AM
Total Posts: 32
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Biography

In 1970 my invention of Diode bias switching brought a nomination for the Nobel Prize in Physics. I was working for AT&T, which was a monopoly at the time and to retain the right to continue as a monopoly, AT&T would periodically agree to surrender certain patent rights to the Federal government in exchange for the privilege of keeping the monopoly going. When my invention came up for the Prize I was delighted until I found that someone else was being nominated with my invention. I asked the CIO, which was the employees union to intervene but they declined and refused to say why they would not help me. The District manager came in to plead with me not to pursue this because it would not accomplish anything and it would only ruin my carrier. The Nobel Prize at the time was worth $5 million dollars US. Besides going insane, I decided to write a letter to someone about this. I wrote to the US Patent office and told them what had happened and that they should pursue this at the Federal Court where hearings on the AT&T monopoly were being held. That AT&T had a practice of assigning a worker at Bell Labs to claim any invention as his own that came from the field. That the Federal Court was in fact accepting stolen intellectual property as payment to keep the monopoly in progress.

Word came down that the monopoly was finished a few weeks later. Then word came down I was the most responsible person for the break-up of the monopoly. Had I remained any longer other employees were threatening to toss me out a fifth story window. So I went to work elsewhere.

My life was falling apart as a result of these events and I was about to file suit against AT&T when my uncle called to tell me that he had received word that the CIA was going to have me shot if I filed suit in order to indite a member of AT&Ts board of directors who they apparently liked less than me.

So I considered my options, everything looked really bleak and I had no idea how to deal with the mess. So I let it rest for a while and relaxed a bit.

Finally it occurred to me that I didn't need to do anything. Since anyway I went with this was going to turn into a disaster, I could escape all of it by doing nothing. I looked at my credentials and it was obvious that being a notable person with credibility was very hazardous to my health. I was an upright person with sound credit, attended church, in a good family, liked and admired. I dressed well, drove a new car and had been a fireman before going to work at AT&T. No tickets, no crimes. Honorably discharged from the Navy... and I felt like my life had ended but I was still walking around wondering what to do.

With the break-up of the monopoly, Engineers from Bell Labs left the lab in droves taking everything they could pack out the door with them to start up businesses across the US in electronics. I was still paralyzed with fear while engineers heaped on law suits against AT&T for stealing credit to their patents. Congress eventually backed the industries, but AT&T(M) was doomed.

I couldn't get over being manic one day and depressed the next so I started trying some of those hippie drugs which were being taken for recreational purposes. Most provided only temporary relief but was notably better than alcohol at providing a pleasant state of mind. My credibility was taking a nose dive and I could care less.

I thought,"Where was I really happy last?". I thought over my life and remembered the California beaches when I was in the Navy. I came here in 1971 and have been very happy with my choice ever since. I have suffered with these problems most of my life and have nothing to show for it beside simply staying alive and happy.

Revenge was never an option and after 30 years of talking to myself find that it has no purpose in my life. I've abandoned everything I thought was important to find the most important thing of all...peace of mind.



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