User Profile for MarkTheHandyman
Name: MarkTheHandyman
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Join Date: 03/30/2006
Member Title: Guru
Last Visit: 04/27/2011 8:01 AM
Last Post Date: 04/22/2011 5:56 AM
Location: Toronto Ontario Canada
Total Posts: 1265 (14 Good Answers)
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Member of User Group Canada
Member Since: 01/03/2008
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Member (since 01/03/2008)
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Toronto, Ontario (South Parkdale On The Lakeshore)

Live in Toronto.

Born in South Porcupine, Ontario (North Country).

Grew up in Hamilton, Ontario.

 
Member of User Group Engineering Fields
Member Since: 01/03/2008
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Marine Engineering (since 01/03/2008)
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Great Lakes School Of Marine Technology (Owen Sound and Port Colbourne)

After a multi-faceted career which ended with architecture until the 1989-90 recession, I studied Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture at the Great Lakes School Of Marine Technology in Ontario.

A brief stint at Naval Architecture in private practice led to an invitation by a firm manufacturing and marketing air pollution abatement devices. I became VP Engineering and Industrial Sales, marketing their new chimney-capping version of their ECD (emissions control device).

Retired from there in 2002.

 
Member of User Group Technical Fields
Member Since: 01/03/2008
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Architecture (since 01/03/2008)
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Private Practice 1976-1990

I was teaching school, general curriculum in North York Ontario when I got a call from the faculty of Environmental Studies at York University to join them and obtain their masters' degree.

While I was enrolled at York, I studied with noted architects, environmental scientists and others concerned with human habitation. I was also cross-appointed to study at the University of Toronto where I met and studied for two years with Dr. Marshall McLuhan, whose concerns centered around the effects produced in all of us by the media we introduce into our universe.

My childhood hobby was architecture, and I became fascinated by the idea that the appearance of an edifice can act as a formal cause in the behaviour of passers-by. I "hung out my shingle" by placing ads in an active retail neighbourhood claiming to be able to re-design the facades of storefronts to literally draw in more customers. As luck would have it, my first client wanted the prototype for his Galaxy Donuts chain, and after producing it, I stayed in architecture for more than fourteen years until a major recession closed the profession down in Toronto.

Because I had not formally graduated in architecture, I had a steady supply of referrals from architects who were not permitted --either by their Association or their professional liability insurance carriers-- (Association member architects will know what those referrals imply) to take on the commissions they passed along, and from city building inspectors from each of the then "Metro Toronto's" Borroughs; as well as from a stream of building contractors and owners for which I did design work and quantity surveying.

During those years, I also partnered in a succession of three contracting companies, where I learned many of the skills that I up until recently employed as a Handyman; I earned a "Construction Site Supervisor's" designation from the Ontario Construction Safety Association; and also owned and operated a reasonably successful small advertising agency on the side.

When I left the practice, closing an office with two employees (a structural engineer and an architectural student), I went back to school to study Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture. After graduating, I worked independently as a Naval Architect for a local yacht importer and also designed a luxury trimaran and a new variety of cargo vessel. It didn't produce much of a living, so I accepted a job as Vice President of Engineering and Industrial Sales with a Brampton company specializing in pollution abatement devices.

 
Member of User Group Technical Fields
Member Since: 01/03/2008
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Education (since 01/03/2008)
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Toronto Teachers' College 1971

Studied Library Science at Seneca College Of Applied Arts & Technology, graduating cum laude in 1969. Used the graduating designation to get into teachers' college.

Graduated from teacher's college in 1971 as a vocal music specialist.

Taught general curriculum subjects in all grade levels Jr. Kindergarten through Grade 13 in North York Ontario between 1971 and 1976. Attended summer Professional Development courses to get a Teacher Librarian designation.

Employed individualized curricula teaching concepts, getting very useful results in the area of student achievement.

Somehow, my teaching methods caught the attention of the Faculty Of Environmental Studies at York University--an umbrella graduate faculty where students design their own courses of study-- and I was contacted 'out of the blue' by the assistant Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Communications to pursue a degree with them in what became labelled as "Masters In Environmental Studies: Education Planning, Administration, and Curriculum Development". This title was in perfect keeping with my verbose nature.

As a curriculum specialist with a Teacher Librarian designation, I taught Curriculum Development to third-year Teacher Librarians at summer school professional development courses for the Ontario Ministry Of Education.

 
Member of User Group Technical Fields
Member Since: 04/20/2008
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Marketing/Advertising (since 04/20/2008)
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Founding Member

After (ignobly) leaving Boston's Emerson College, where I studied Broadcasting in 1961-62, I was employed by CKCR (now defunct) in Kitchener Ontario, where I sold advertising and wrote copy, set up remotes, etc. With my college radio background, where vital personality traits won radio time, I used my unabashed outgoing style to design direct mail advertising and help pioneer outrageous Canadian radio advertising copy during my tenure (literally lived in my car, showered at the Y) there while I learned the broadcasting business. "(Roar! Scream! There's a tiger eating up Kitchener Ontario! Tiger Flooring blah blah blah)" etc. etc. (had a hell of a time convicing the station management to try this kind of stuff).

Eventually, I moved up through the ranks until I left the business in 1967 as head of the News Department (doing a DJ swing-shift on the weekends) at CKAP, a CBC affiliate station in Kapuskasing Ontario (still there). I moved on into other things.

Several years later in 1983, something possessed me to revive my advertising skills by opening up a full-service advertising agency in Toronto while I was practicing architecture there. So I took a small hiatus, and opened up an agency referred to in the trade as "Hey, Everybody!", although its full name was "Hey, Everybody! Here I am! For those who want to be noticed, Inc." (If you have a 1983 Toronto yellow pages, check out our ad & logo. At that time, advertising agencies in Toronto didn't self advertise. We had the yellow pages category wrapped up for nearly two years until the big guys followed suit.)

After several successful campaigns, I was forced to close the company doors in less than two years after being hung out to dry by a charitable client. After all their graphic advertising was researched, designed and printed, media purchased, the best halls booked coast-to-coast as concert venues, and talent actually flown into the country for the concert series, the client changed its mind about its planned Canada-wide fund-raising series of concerts and cancelled based upon its fear of potentially low ticket sales. The talent was furious, but though my creditors--based upon previous good business relations-- were forgiving and generous, they now required up-front money for any company-generated campaigns. Since an agency depends upon its credit with the media to function, "Hey, Everybody!" was forced out of business.

During the life of the company, it had entered a full multi media campaign in the Canadian competition for 'best campaign of the year' for the work it did (demographics, informal but thorough telephone opinion polling, concept, creative, artwork, media purchasing, television 30-second full animation commercial, billboard, transit, jingle, logo, client in-house rewards structure & pin for sales performance, PR grand opening with specialty mementos, and lawn signage) for Premore Realty in Toronto. It didn't win, but we were very proud of the quality of the work we did. Our campaigns were always designed around the client demographic, and never depended on creative for the message, only the creative delivery approach for presenting it.

Since that time, I have acted as public relations person for Toronto Distress Centers (1 year) and assisted with various other advertising and public relations gigs. When I began with Sparc~Air, it was with the infant company as Marketing Manager, receiving a promotion to Assistant Director of Marketing, wherein I set up a full-service in-house Marketing Group. Only later as an engineer did I become VP: Engineering & Industrial Sales. Although retired from the company, I now consult to it for graphics creative.

In case you hadn't noticed, I still love writing copy!

 
Member of User Group Hobbies
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Membership Type:
Hunting (since 10/10/2008)
Member Message:

Founding Member

Perhaps my approach to hunting is not the same as everybody's. I regard it as the most loving way to kill for food.

First, because the hunter is someone who takes full responsibility for doing that task (as compared, for example, to purchasing meat in a local meat vendor from animals that have been penned up under stressful circumstances, then killed in an inhumane manner by anonymous contributors --purchasers--).

Hunting is a one-on-one arrangement with Manitou for sustenance, and requires a host of compensating behaviours we now term 'conservation'.

And secondly, as an accurate shooter, I know the animal will never know what happened to it. One moment, it is prancing around the forest enjoying its life; the next split second, it is meat for the table. It never even hears the gunshot, which at 1000 mps or more is much faster than the speed of sound. Death from a heart shot is instantaneous, since in the smallest fraction of a second the impact spreads in a cone from a bullet sized 1/4 inch to more than 10 inches in diameter. I used to bow hunt, and loved it. But I stopped because it takes 10 to 20 minutes for a good heart/lung shot to bleed out the animal, which must then be tracked until found where it went down; and although the arrows travel right through their target, there are no guarantees that it doesn't die in pain. Not humane enough for me.

Lastly, the act of hunting is the act of becoming one with the wild forest together with the act of a deep abiding communication with fellow hunters in the same hunt that reaches back into some satisfying deep past steeped in ancient unwritten history and soul-connection. It's an old-brain activity that originated when the hunter could as well become the hunted at any time, and hunters moved together as much for protection as better ensuring the success of the hunt.

 
Member of User Group Hobbies
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Membership Type:
Target Shooting (since 10/10/2008)
Member Message:

Founding Member

My father owned a golf driving range for a number of years; and latterly, he decided to include an archery range as a part of the operation. Both my brother and I worked at the 'range', and learned to hit a fair ball and shoot a fairly accurate bow over time.

Later, I learned to target shoot with rifles at a rifle range when getting ready for hunting season. I really enjoy the activity.

It wasn't long before I wanted to branch out, and obtained a restricted weapons approval on my Possession Acquisition Licence. Shooting at the local range is a great challenge sport.

I think biathlon is an amazing expression of shooting combined with athletics and never fail to be jaw-dropping amazed at the accuracy of shooters who must be breathing very hard when they pop off those targets.

 


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