Previous in Forum: Battery back-up   Next in Forum: wet cell battery test
Close
Close
Close
13 comments
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 435
Good Answers: 4

Connecting a bandsaw

06/28/2008 3:42 PM

Hi guys,

I believe this is wired for 220Vac 60 Hz.

I just bought a bandsaw (second hand) made by an Italian company (MEBER). The machine originally came with a 3 phase motor which has been changed to a north american 110/220V 60Hz (not by me, obviously) and I want to be sure of the connections before applying power to it (want to confirm if it's wired for 110 or 220V). There are 2 identical startup caps and the drawing of the present connections is in the last pic. Refer to the pics below:

Thanks in advance....

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16499
Good Answers: 663
#1

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/28/2008 4:02 PM

Tricky one...

The wiring doesn't match either of the schemes on the plate, as far as I can see.

If you believe it was running ok before you got it, I'd check it out mechanically and then risk applying 110v briefly to it, (from a safe distance) and take it from there... (OK ok I can hear the howls of righteous indignation from here.....but I'm not suggesting you cover it with petrol soaked rags first...).

The other alternative would be to wire it as per the plate...but you have no guaranty that the information there is correct either.

I was given a small bandsaw a while back by a guy who was about to throw it onto the council rubbish tip! ( I gave it a visual once over and then switched it on from a safe distance it blew up and killed me it was fine .

BTW...great thread with nice pics...makes a change from

'pls tell everything about nuclear reactor urgent'

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 435
Good Answers: 4
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/28/2008 4:18 PM

Hi Del,

Thanks for the compliment...

To make a long story short, the bandsaw was bought from a machine shop about 7-8 years ago by a man who never had a chance to run it (died shortly after). His wife wanted to get rid of it along with a combo machine (tablesaw, shaper, jointer/planer) and I got both for an amazing price (under 2k). The machine shop has closed since so no luck on that side.

What would happen if it was wired for 220v and I hooked it up to 110v? Would I smoke the motor?

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16499
Good Answers: 663
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/28/2008 5:23 PM

I think you will be ok if it is set for 220 and you run it on 110 briefly...dunno exactly what will happen..but my guess is it will be obvious it's 'not right' but it shouldn't go bang or smoke...unless of course it hums loudly and doesn't rotate and you are dumb enough to leave it like that while you go up the pub .

If it's set for 110 and you put 220 on it my guess is that could be nastier....

That's why I say 'briefly'... pencil me in for all the usual cautionary word, disclaimers etc.

If it doesn't seem right, I'd be tempted to wire it as per the plate.

If it does seem ok, then run it for a few minutes...check it doesn't get too hot, then maybe 15 mins... but bear in mind something big like that can be overheating inside and still be cold outside...it can take half an hour for the casing to heat up...so even when you think it's ok...slowly does it and buil up the run time until you are confident.

Maybe someone will come up with a fool proof way of checking it out.

And I'm only too willing to bow to those more experienced..(but please don't Andy anyone tell me I'm not a safe kitty )

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 435
Good Answers: 4
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/28/2008 8:33 PM

"...unless of course it hums loudly and doesn't rotate and you are dumb enough to leave it like that while you go up the pub ."

Holy crap Del !

I just wasted a puuurfectly good sip of wine ...thanks for the laugh...

Getting too late here to go and try that now so I'll finish the bottle of wine in the SPA and give it a go tomorrow. I'll let you know how it went (kaboom! - hopefully not!)

Cheers,

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
2
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South East of Las Vegas just far enough to see the lights but far enough to not hear the coins falling
Posts: 282
Good Answers: 8
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Connecting a band saw

06/28/2008 11:59 PM

From the field:

We recently moved our shop and at the same time purchased some used equipment.\

Three of them the voltages were unknown.

We pulled the motors and dropped them by our local electric motor repair shop. I asked the shop owner to give them a once over and repair as needed. I also told him to tag them for the equipment model and speed, I told him the voltage that I need for each piece of equipment.

This is normal for a service company

Mike Robertson

__________________
Rule number one; Never ask a question unless you are prepared for an answer that you may not like.
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16499
Good Answers: 663
#7
In reply to #5

Re: Connecting a band saw

06/29/2008 3:41 AM

Whew GA...I was hoping someone would come along with a sensuble answer and pull me out of the hole I was digging for myself .

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Commentator
United States - Member - Northen Member Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Power Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: CookInlet AK
Posts: 67
Good Answers: 2
#6
In reply to #4

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/29/2008 2:10 AM

Greetings,

While it is running on 110VAC check the current load.

If the motor is wired for 110 and running on 110 you should see around 9.5A

If the motor is wired for 220 and running on 110 I would think the current would be greater than that.

Good luck....

Register to Reply
Guru
Australia - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NSW Australia
Posts: 1088
Good Answers: 23
#8

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/29/2008 8:56 AM

Hi rick,

Looking at the printed label of connection terminals I would think the running windings are 1 and 2---also 3 and 4 both of which would be 115 Volt. The starting winding would be 5 and 6 also rated at 115 Volt. when in 230 Volt mode this is strapped across one of the 115volt run windings the start capacitors are only rated at 125 Volt and would expect them to be in series with the start winding via a centrifugal switch.

The wiring schematic does not seem to bear any relation to the above connections as the run windings are connected to the capacitors and going nowhere and the start winding is connected across the incoming mains this is assuming the numbering system relates to each other which I seriously doubt is the case.

If you remove the links and do some resistance measurements across the coils you should find two of the coils which read about the same resistance these would be the run windings the other one would be a lower resistance and this would be the start winding be careful that the switch contacts are less not than 100% or the reading could be higher if this is the case hopefully it wont coincide with a run winding value if it does you will have to open up the motor to get at the connection unless they have all being brought out to the connection plate.

My best guess it is connected for 115Volt

__________________
Dont get on to the roundabout if you dont know how to get off
Register to Reply
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 435
Good Answers: 4
#13
In reply to #8

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/30/2008 8:12 AM

Hi Garth,


I just realized that I didn't included you in my "general" answer yesterday but I had read your comment and you are right. It was wired for 115. I will re-wire the motor to run on 220 though. I'm not quite sure I understood your last paragraph...

Thanks for your comment.

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 6046
Good Answers: 245
#9

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/29/2008 12:32 PM

I hope someone sees this that knows more than I do! The motor label says it is a 3 phase motor, but a true 3 phase motor requires (duh) 3 phases, meaning at least 3 wires. Also, I've never heard of a 3 phase motor that used starting caps!

Was this motor rewound and not relabeled, or is the label simply misleading/wrong?

As Del said, good pics! I presume all of them are of the current motor...

I also presume this is a woodcutting bandsaw; otherwise why a 3400 RPM motor?

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Active Contributor

Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 19
#10

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/29/2008 5:20 PM

Hi: I am a long time reader but a first time Poster. I have been an Electrician for more than 40 years.

As I look at the motor connection diagram on the name plate it would appear that.

This motor is a 2 pole 3450 RPM Motor. It can be wired to operate from an 120 or 240 volt single phase power source.

Leads no 1 and 2 are connected to one run winding coil. Leads number 3 and 4 are connected to the second run winding coil. Leads number 5 and 6 are connected to the start winding coil.

I would connect this motor exactly as the Name plate states. That is for 220 volts 1 phase, I would connect motor leads number 2,3,5 together. Then connect motor lead number 1 to one leg of the 220 volt supply and then connect motor leads numbers 4 and 6 to the other leg of the 220 volt supply.

If you find you need to reverse this motor just interchange the connection points of leads no 5 and 6. That would mean the lead number 6 would be connected to 2 and 3. Lead no 5 would then be connected with lead number 4.

As I review the wiring drawing at the bottom of your post I find there is an error some place. The drawing does not appear to agree with the Name plate. I would not follow this drawing as I believe the motor would do up in smoke very quickly.

In the land of Electric Motors the Name Plate Data rules.

Hope this helps: Howard, from Canada

Register to Reply
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 435
Good Answers: 4
#11

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/29/2008 8:01 PM

Hi again,

Thank you all for your input. I was busy playing with the second machine today, dismantling the various parts to figure out what bearings/belts needed changing and for general maintenance. I think I'll make a blog out of this....soon.

DK,

I believe the motor was changed with a Taiwan company motor and was mis-labeled. It is a wood cutting band saw and the pics are actual. I thought the same thing when I saw the 3 phase tag and the 110/220v indicated below.

Del,

I followed your advice (hooking 110v briefly). The motor started fine and then I stopped it. I tried it again with an amp meter and on startup, it read something like 30A !!! but then quickly settled down to 4A (no load/blade, driving wheel only). It seems somehow that this hookup is wired for 110v. I will re-wire it for 220v.

Howard,

Welcome to the site. As you already know, This is a great bunch of guys with plenty of humor. I've learned more here (ok, maybe not but close) than in the 20 years on the work force. You are right about the startup winding coil (5-6) so will follow your advice since I want these machines to run on 220v. I might seek your help again when comes time to hook up the combo machine.

All,

Once I clean up the garage so I can take better pics of the machines, I will start a blog (and probably ask a few more questions) and let you see what a great deal I got. I'll be back tomorrow.

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16499
Good Answers: 663
#12
In reply to #11

Re: Connecting a bandsaw

06/30/2008 4:15 AM

Whew, I've been out all day... Glad it didn't blow up!
NIce to get the update.

You've got some great advice on this thread (I don't mean mine )... I look forward to the blog.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply
Register to Reply 13 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

CrossFire (1); Del the cat (4); dkwarner (1); garth (1); Jdhautomation (1); miketheboilerguy (1); Rick@cae (4)

Previous in Forum: Battery back-up   Next in Forum: wet cell battery test

Advertisement