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Guru
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One Pixel Does the Trick

11/02/2006 8:54 AM

Modern digital cameras boast numbers of pixels running into millions. Now researchers at Rice University, Texas have designed a camera that needs only one pixel, i.e. just one photodiode. A digital micromirror device samples the image at a high rate, passing the light signal to the photodiode; software reconstructs the image.

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Power-User

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#1

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/03/2006 5:15 AM

Came across a similar method 30 years ago using a spinning mirror to scan lines of infra red onto a single detector cell - this was the device we now know as a Thermal Imaging camera used by most fire departments.

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Guru
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#2

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/03/2006 6:13 AM

The very first television developed in England by Charles Logi Baird used the same concept of rotating mirror to generate and image back in the 1930 so the idea has been around for a while.

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Anonymous Poster
#8
In reply to #2

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/23/2006 6:48 AM

you people in New Zealand should realise that JOHN Logie Baird was a Scotsman - this Charles Logi Bear was clearly an impostor who would spend too much time watching a poor cricket team.

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Anonymous Poster
#3

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/03/2006 11:06 AM

Loudspeakers and microphones are equal, but opposite devices from a technological/engineering standpoint. If T.I. D.M.D. is used to reconstruct images via millions of tilting mirrors and a color wheel, then why not be able to capture an image using the same technology? Since millions of mirrors are impractical for use in a handheld camera, the only substitute from this 'equal but opposite' concept is to supplant the millions of mirrors with only one mirror combined with software that makes the one mirror act like a million.

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Guru

Join Date: Sep 2006
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#4

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/03/2006 7:58 PM

Another thread discussing this topic was posted by Roger Pink in the General Section (pg3): http://cr4.globalspec.com/thread/2815/Single-Pixel-Cameras

-E

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Guru
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#5

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/03/2006 9:00 PM

oh, there is a one bit A/D system now we have one pixel camera. and one bit mic etc.

interesting.

But now the quality of the picture is not satisfaction. when we visited the web and seee their tested picture.

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Guru

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/04/2006 12:18 AM

As I understand it (and please correct me if I'm wrong), there is an ancient Chinese proverb which says: "A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step." (substituting the appropriate historical units of measure for 'miles' of course)

I suspect that what you saw on their web site is the "one step" part of which this proverb speaks.

-E

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Power-User

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#7

Re: One Pixel Does the Trick

11/07/2006 4:38 AM

A passive scanning image sensor (i.e. one without its own dedicated light source) inevitably needs much more light than the equivalent multi-pixel sensor. Then there are the hybrids - line imagers and partial-area imagers; the scheme known as "time delay and integrate" is an interesting variant.

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