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Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/29/2009 11:41 AM

Last week I had my car diagnosis- I wasn't happy with the quotes for repairs. I just want to make sure I'm not getting robbed. Three codes pop-up from the diagnosis test - reading CODES: P0700 = TRANSMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM MIL REQUIRED

P0715 = INPUT/TURBINE SPEED SENSOR A CIRCUIT MALFUNCTION

P0141 = 02 SENSOR HEATER CIRCUIT BANK SENSOR

WHEN IT COME TO MONEY, WHO DO YOU TRUST! I WILL LIKE TO NO HOW TO ATTACH THESE PROBLEMS WITH MY CAR, KNOWING WHAT KIND OF MONEY I WILL HAVE TO REALLY SPEND.

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#1

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/29/2009 5:05 PM

Hello Mike,

Let's give CR4 members a little more information; make, model, year, engine, type transmission, mileage and mileage since last full service, overall vehicle condition.

Thanks...

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/29/2009 11:00 PM

bwire's right, Mike. The more info we have, the better job we can do for you.

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#5
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Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/30/2009 4:44 PM

Sorry! This is Big Mike, the car is 1996 S 420 Mercedes Benz CHASSIS: 140.043 LITER: 4.2 CYL: V8 ENG NUM: 119.981 MILEAGE: 180,000 THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME AND EFFORT!

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/30/2009 6:46 PM

Okay Mike but please release the caps lock you're hurting my ears...

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#3

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/29/2009 11:36 PM

There are many code readers online for $75 or less. SInce car dealers like to charge $75 or more to just read your codes. codes very from make to make and year to year. make sure what you buy reads your codes. Thay are also sold in many car parts shops. The car dealers have never heard of this. They have a machine that sucks $$ out of you.

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&ei=RNg6S7H8OcOUnQfn8rGCCQ&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&ved=0CAwQBSgA&q=%22automotive+code%22+%2Breader&spell=1&fp=cbc2f75bf9d43a8f

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#4

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/30/2009 9:19 AM

"WHEN IT COME TO MONEY, WHO DO YOU TRUST! I WILL LIKE TO NO HOW TO ATTACH THESE PROBLEMS WITH MY CAR, KNOWING WHAT KIND OF MONEY I WILL HAVE TO REALLY SPEND."

Big Mike

Your frustration is a common one because many new mechanics today only read codes and change parts - a quick but expensive process. They have neither the in depth automotive experience and technical understanding nor the ability to diagnose a bad component before replacing it. Just reading a code directs you to the trouble area, but does not always provide the root cause or the best way to correct it.

To answer your question, if you have little automotive knowledge or experience, your best bet is to ask around, search out and establish a good working relationship with an ASE certified master mechanic who is open to explaining what your problem is and how their quoted work will correct it. Trustworthy people who know their stuff (like many in this forum) have no problem with this approach because they have nothing to hide and much to provide. Once you find that person, give them all of your work, ask them questions until you understand and tell all your friends and family.

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#7

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/30/2009 8:27 PM

Transmission control system MIL required

MIL= malfunction indicator lamp

normally lamp check is with ignition on enginre off --do not know with MB

how does it know? amp sensor in the computer ?

Input/turbine speed sensor

input turbine must be turning because the engine is running but no input to computer from sensor----bad sensor, or wiring or computer pick the least expensive unless you can test the sensor? pulse or analogue?

O2 heater circuit ---oxygen sensor with heater (to read faster at cold engine start)

malfunction either heater is burned out (replace sensor as not seperate servicible) or wiring or computer. If more than 1 sensor,- left bank or right bank or even before and after the cat. converter it should indicate which one, if not its a guess?

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#10
In reply to #7

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/31/2009 2:37 PM

Re Oxygen sensors:

Contamination of oxygen sensors with any lubricating substance such as WD 40 that contains silicone or by coolant/Anti-freeze will damage &/or destroy an Oxygen sensor and cause it to give faulty readings. These do not have to come into direct contact with the actual sensor that is in the hot exhaust stream. They can be ruined by these substances coming in contact to the external parts that are accessible while they are still installed in the engine.

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#8

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/31/2009 2:44 AM

CODES: P0700 = TRANSMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM MIL REQUIRED

Check the right front side of trans for a leaking (fluid) electrical plug

code will if 1/2 liter leaks out, fix then fill

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#9

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

12/31/2009 2:25 PM

By virtue of the fact that you are aware and seeking specific knowledge of these types of things, I suggest that you purchase your own Code Reader. They are relatively inexpensive now and any vehicle after 1994 are much more 'universal' than prior to then which required several different code readers to cover the wide range of vehicles. With your aptitude and not being intimidated by such things it will pay for itself many times over and you will have the benefit of being able to access the error codes at any time and will have much more knowledge that YOU are confident in when seeking out required repairs. Also some vehicles have the code readout functions built into and integrated with the OEM Radio. In the latter case, you just follow the specified procedure and it will exhibit the codes on the display of the OEM radio. If you utilize either of these methods, familiarize yourself with the operation of these throughly before utilizing them and be careful NOT to clear the stored codes until repairs are completed. Good Luck and good motoring. PS: If you live in a part of the world that undergoes wide variations in ambient temperatures, I suggest utilization of 5W-50 synthetic oil. I suggest this regardless of the range of ambient temperatures, but the wider it is, the more important this becomes. Along these lines, when doing or having an oil change done, repeatedly fill up the new oil filter until it is completely saturated and will not absorb any more oil prior to putting it onto the vehicle. I do this regardless if I am doing it myself or having it done at an 'oil change' specialty shop. Even if having such a shop do the actual oil change, I buy my preferred Oil & filter and take it with me and fill the filter up before giving it to the mechanic to install. Engines undergo more wear in the first 15 ~ 30 seconds when it is started up than 8 hours of driving! This is because all of the oil has drained out from the lubricated surfaces if it is parked for a couple of hours. High end race cars and large diesel engines have sub systems that force and flood the lubricant to the required surfaces prior to starting the engine to avoid this. By saturating the new oil filter with oil prior to starting the engine, you will avoid the lag in lubricant getting to the necessary parts ASAP rather than the delay that is introduced by having to fill and saturate the oil filter before it gets to the required engine parts. You can hear this yourself with nothing but your ears. If the filter is dry, you will hear various loud noises of un-lubricated parts moving and wearing very rapidly that will quiet down as the lubricant finally reaches the needed surfaces. As I said, you do not need anything but your hearing. If you try starting the vehicle with and without filling the oil filter 1st before starting it, the difference will be readily apparent. The colder the engine and the oil is, which thickens it up considerably, the longer this lag will be. Also starting an engine that is very hot due to running while it and the oil are very hot has the same affect but for the opposite reason: the HOT oil viscosity is lowered significantly and drains from the lubricated parts very quickly. Hence my recommendation for a synthetic oil with a broader and a much higher temperature range. There are after-market devices that flood the engine with lubricant prior to it being started that significantly reduces the wear during start up due to lack of lubrication.

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#11

Re: Auto Repairs and Diagnostic Codes

01/06/2010 12:35 AM

The P041 code means that the heater in the O2 sensor has failed, a common problem at 80,000 - 100,000 miles. Easy to fix, and in my Honda it took 20 minutes in my driveway, stretching under the car. The dealer wanted $200 labor -- unbelievable! On a lift it would be a 10 minute job. The O2 sensors are sometimes seized (so hard to remove) and maybe the dealer was overcompensating for that possibility.... naaaah... they are just routinely ripping people off.

P0715 usually means the turbine (torque converter) speed sensor has failed. Often this is easy to replace -- but you'd want to test to make sure that it is really a sensor failure.

re 0700: I'd guess the transmission MIL light condition is sensed to be open circuit (burned out). This is the sort of thing that requires a $1.00 part (sold at $10 because it is a Mercedes) but requires a phenomenal amount of work to install... maybe. It might be easy, if you're lucky.

OBD2 started in 1996, so any OBD2 reader will work with your Mercedes. (Prior to 1996, there was variation from manufacturer to manufacturer.) My guess is that the codes are legit. (Your MIL for the trans should be on -- but of course, if it's burned out, you would not see it.) Some Autozones will check your codes for free, I've heard -- it only takes a minute.

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aurizon (1); Big Mike (1); Blink (1); bwire (3); DougRH (2); MIKE L. (1); standarded (1); U NO WHO (1)

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