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Potential Corrosion vs. Corrosion Potential

01/11/2010 8:06 PM

is there anything that is called "potential corrosion"? or is it some sort of misunderstanding coz normally we use "corrosion potential" not "potential corrosion".

anyone explains this ?

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#1

Re: potential corrosion

01/11/2010 9:25 PM

The "corrosion potential" can be used to predict the "potential corrosion" of a material.

Semantics is the bane of contemporary verbal intercourse.

How many languages has the document been translated through?

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: potential corrosion

01/11/2010 9:31 PM

well, rather you can say translation is the bane of contemporary verbal intercourse.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: potential corrosion

01/11/2010 9:35 PM

Translation is the first step to understanding.

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: potential corrosion

01/11/2010 10:46 PM

thanks for your input~~~I was working on a paper translation the other day and those two terms popped up . I was rather confused so i came here to seek help. anyway,thanks for your help~~

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#5
In reply to #1

Re: potential corrosion

01/12/2010 2:29 AM

Like your answer Lynlinch, explains the difference perfectly. Just to elaborate for possible non native English speakers;

corrosion potential (Ecorr). The potential of a corroding surface in an electrolyte, relative to a reference electrode. Also called rest potential, open circuit potential, or freely corroding potential.

Potential is an adjective meaning - existing in possibility. So potential corrosion should just mean that there is a possibility that corrosion might occur. Unfortunately many references use this term interchangeably with "corrosion potential" which I believe to be wrong and confusing.

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#8
In reply to #5

Re: potential corrosion

01/13/2010 1:40 PM

Actually in this case the word potential indicates a measurable electrical potential, a potential energy difference, not so much the more abstract concept of something that has the possibility to occur. We then categorize or group the ranges of potentials to reference the degree and likelihood that corrosion will occur to a material so exposed.

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: potential corrosion

01/13/2010 6:59 PM

Actually in this case the word potential indicates a measurable electrical potential,

It may or may not. For example "Paint and oil are both potential corrosion inhibitors." Without context, it is hard to say that "potential" in the word combination refers to electric potential.

If we wanted to specify a type of corrosion then galvanic corrosion would generally be used instead of calling that type of corrosion "potential corrosion".

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: potential corrosion

01/13/2010 7:11 PM

He was asking about the specific term corrosion potential, versus the use of a term like potential corrosion. The the term potential corrosion inhibitor mean the material inhibits possibility or likelihood of corrosion. Corrosion potential is different and more definitive.

If has more to do with the permutation than the combination of the words corrosion and potential. One will mean the possibility for corrosion to occur, and the other will mean the measurable electrical potential difference that can be correlated to the corrosivity of a material. The difference is a matter of specificity, i.e. think of these two terms potential voltage and voltage potential and you will see it.

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: potential corrosion

01/14/2010 7:16 PM

I think your response is more appropriate~~

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#6

Re: Potential Corrosion vs. Corrosion Potential

01/13/2010 9:57 AM

Can you give us an example (say a quote) of these being used?

In English, the convention is that the adjective precedes the noun. So, 'corrosion potential' is a potential (electric in this case) having to do with corrosion ... in this case, that means the difference in electromotive forces between two conductors. If those two conductors touch each other and an electric circuit is completed (for example, through ground connections), then current will flow from the more electropositive one (the anode) to the less-electropositive one (the cathode). This will ionize atoms to positive-charged ion sin the anode and the ions will leave the anode, thus corroding it. (That's the principle behind using 'sacrificial anodes' to protect against corrosion, by the way). Note that electrons don't accumulate in the cathode ... they get carried away by the electric circuit, so negative ions don't accumulate in it; only the anode gets corroded.

As for 'potential corrosion' ... that means corrosion (the noun) of which there is a foreseeable possibility (another definition of the word 'potential'). In this sense, "there's potential corrosion that must be considered" means "there MIGHT be corrosion in the future if we don't do anything against it'.

That being said ... I'm assuming that whoever said 'corrosion potential' / 'potential corrosion' is fluent in English AND that the article was originally written in English. If the original article was written in another language, then the reasoning behind the order of the words could be influenced by the original language. For example, in French, the convention is the reverse of the English one's .. nouns precede adjectives. So 'corrosion potential' would be 'potential of/for corrosion', and 'potential corrosion' would be 'corrosion potentielle'. Technical translators not specialized in the field covered by the article and automated translators (followed by human correction) have difficulty with this kind of thing.

Hence why I ask for sample texts where the two expressions are used: they'll put the thing in context.

Cheers! DZ

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#7

Re: Potential Corrosion vs. Corrosion Potential

01/13/2010 12:14 PM

Having been a technical writer occasionally working with translations, I have an urge to comment... but posts 5 and 6 are both very good. << I'll leave my comment at that.

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