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Anonymous Poster

AgNO3 limits in drinking water

04/10/2010 1:54 AM

Recommended limits of AgNO3 in drinking water.

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Guru

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#1

Re: AgNO3 limits in drinking water

04/10/2010 11:04 AM

Although silver nitrate is currently not regulated in water sources by the Environmental Protection Agency, when between 1-5 g of silver have accumulated in the body, a condition called argyria can develop. Argyria is a permanent cosmetic condition in which the skin and internal organs turn a blue-gray color. The United States Environmental Protection Agency had a maximum contaminant limit for silver in water until 1990, but upon determination that argyria did not impact the function of organs affected, removed the regulation.[27] Argyria is more often associated with the consumption of colloidal silver solutions than with silver nitrate, especially at the extremely low concentrations present for the disinfection of water. However, it is still important to consider before ingesting any sort of silver-ion solution.

taken from end of

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_nitrate

any use ?

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Guru

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#2

Re: AgNO3 limits in drinking water

04/10/2010 11:05 AM
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Guru
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#3

Re: AgNO3 limits in drinking water

04/10/2010 7:17 PM

If you want to use silver as a decontaminant, maybe think about using a silver filter on your water source instead of adding silver nitrate to the water.

Silver nitrate is not the form of silver you want in water IMHO. Being a caustic substance very irritant to membranes and causing cumulative reactions on repeat exposures, as well as not reliable as a decontaminant due to irregular rates of decomposition depending on other mineral content of the water, etc etc.

If you still want to drink water containing dissolved silver nitrate, you might want to avoid alcohol.

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