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Gridline

04/17/2011 5:28 AM

Anybody in civil world knows what gridline means and what it uses for?

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#1

Re: Gridline

04/17/2011 9:59 AM

A gridline is an imaginary line used for convenience in referring to a location on a drawing. It usually has a name shown at one or both ends of the plan. Gridlines are similar to street or avenue names on a map of a city.

For example, a building in plan may have numerous walls or column lines in two or more directions. These may be identified using gridlines named A, B, C, etc. in one direction and 1, 2, 3, etc. in another direction. Column B3 pinpoints the precise location of a column in plan without having to say "second column from the left and third from the top".

Gridlines may be used anywhere in order to make referencing more convenient for the user but too many gridlines tend to be confusing.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Gridline

04/17/2011 9:29 PM

Thank you Ba/ael,

But if you don't mind, could you be more detailed in teaching me about "It usually has a name shown at one or both ends of the plan"? What you want to imply me?

I can understand gridline is a system where we can apply this to find the boundary of wall or column in the real situation. Is that correct?

Another question, I don't know how the contractor can locate the landmark like the corner of the building to start construction? Once, the landmark is dertermined, is there any aggreement in term of documentation between contractor and the owner?

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: Gridline

04/17/2011 11:45 PM

You can find examples of drawings with gridlines on the internet using Google. The following is an example of gridlines with no other information on the drawing.

Gridlines A through H are vertical with a label at the top. Gridlines 1 through 5 are horizontal with a label at the right.

On a large plan, it may be useful to provide a label at the bottom and left for ease of reference.

If you have an exterior wall all around the building, you could decide to have the exterior face align with gridlines A, H, 1 and 5.

If you have a column at the intersection of Gridline B and Gridline 3, it would be usual practice to label it Column B3.

The contractor starts with a survey prepared by a surveyor. A pin is placed in the ground at, say Grid points A1 and H1. The contractor stretches a stringline between those points (or offset points). He can add as many stringlines as he wants to locate various elements on the plan.

Of course there is documentation between contractor and owner. It is called a contract. Even when everything is well documented, there can be disagreements but without a contract, there is no basis to resolve disputes.

Here is another example of gridlines, this time on a circular or grid.

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