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Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 196
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Low and High Pressure Fluid Safety

08/05/2011 6:06 PM

Hello all,

Been off the grid for awhile.

I need help with locating a source for identifying and downloading safety standards for performing work on low to high pressure fluids. (10 - 2800 PSI)

I am up to my neck in HIRA - OHSAS documentation and must define safe operating procedures for all of the Instrumentation Technicians when working on compressed air, NG, LPG, water, oil, acetylene, etc.

Anyone have a good source for safety standards on this subject.

Appreciate the help,

Jim

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Guru
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Join Date: Oct 2008
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#1

Re: Low and High Pressure Fluid Safety

08/05/2011 6:53 PM

OSHA has your answers.

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Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2008
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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Low and High Pressure Fluid Safety

08/09/2011 9:57 AM

Good morning,

Thanks for the response.

Wading through the OSHA documents is a bit tedious to say the least.

I am hoping that there is an easier way to accomplish the task.

I thought maybe someone had already complied the documentation in an easy to read format that all of our techs can master so they stay safe in the workplace.

My plate runneth over and the ravenous alligators are increasingly exponentially in the quay.

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Guru

Join Date: Jul 2008
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#2

Re: Low and High Pressure Fluid Safety

08/06/2011 11:59 PM

Hi Shockiscan!

Many many decades ago, before the invention of OSHA, the "new gestapo", I was working in the car business.

One of the mechanics at a local dealership was testing the spray pattern on a diesel injector using a special pump designed to develop the pressures required.

One of the injectors did not fire at the requisite pressure and for reasons no one could explain the guy waved his hand under the nozzel.

Yup! it happened. . . . . . . . the injector fired and the pressure created an embolism (?) of diesel fuel in a primary blood vessel.

Fortunately, an ambulance was nearby and the hospital was but 5 minutes away.

They saved his life.

The incident inspired a whole new generation of self imposed safety rules as well as a training program that soon got the endorsement of the insurance company. OSHA did not exist back then.

Today we must COA's and show compliance with a government agency that I have little respect for, a position I took after watching a 600% increase in injuries as a consequence of forced compliance with new safety guards they demanded on machines with demonstrated safety records.

Fortunately, Congress got enough heat to impose leashes on the goon squads that existed then.

I understand that the current enforcement is more benevolent and rational.

Still, when dealing with the Feds, it's prudent to do your own rigorous thinking about safety and not depend solely on what they say. That you complied with Government standards won't mean Bupkis when someone gets hurt.

A good example of this was a major airframe manufacturer in the General Aviation community who built a popular twin engined plane, one that was certified for use in known icing conditions by the FAA.

When that plane crashed after flying through known icing conditions and the occupants all died, the manufacturer got sued, big time, . . . . . not the FAA.

Trust no one. Write your own standards. Know the OSHA rules but only as guidelines.

L.J.

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