Shock, Vibration and Noise Blog

The Shock, Vibration and Noise Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about shock absorbers, dampers and gas springs; noise control and measurement; vibration/acceleration control systems; and machine mounts and vibration isolators process control tools, specialty chemicals and health and safety. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Play an Instrument? You May React Faster as a Result

Posted February 02, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

A new study shows that musicians have faster reaction times to sensory stimuli than non-musicians. They were told to click the mouse when they heard a burst of sound from the speakers, when the box vibrated, or when both happened. Subjects wore earplugs to mask any buzzing “audio clue” when the box vibrated.


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8 comments; last comment on 02/03/2017
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What's Your Machine's Signature?

Posted September 05, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

All machines have a unique vibration signature that changes as operating conditions alter. When a disruption in signature occurs, engineers analyze the severity of the faulty condition. This piece from Engineering360 highlights the types of analyzers that monitor signatures, including accelerometers, displacement sensors, and velocity sensors. Additionally, the author discusses critical features of vibration analyzers such as accuracy and sampling frequency. The takeaway message: vibration analysis is an important predictive maintenance tool that helps detect failures and prevent costly equipment downtime.


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1 comments; last comment on 09/09/2015
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Could Buildings "Hover" Above an Earthquake?

Posted August 08, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

The creator of the hoverboard has proposed a three-part foundation that, he claims, could prevent buildings from shaking during an earthquake. The patented idea combines the U.S. Geological Survey's ShakeAlert system with a magnetic-field architecture. When the foundation senses an event it goes into "hover mode," essentially decoupling from the event. The inventor says the system could be retrofitted to existing structures, but is better suited to new construction.


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20 comments; last comment on 08/11/2015
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Spotting Train Vibrations

Posted June 14, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

In light of the recent Amtrak crash near Philadelphia, a review of recent safety measures is necessary. European rail regulations, for example, dictate that trains traveling in excess of 160 km/hr (99 mph) must support bogie-mounted vibration sensors to help prevent derailment. Such systems are outfitted on new high-speed trains in Saudi Arabia. Curve detection sensors are also critical. Able to detect when a train enters and exits a curve, these sensors inform the train's wheel lubrication system, which in turn provides lubricant to the wheels at the right time and in the right amount.


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19 comments; last comment on 06/17/2015
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Taking the Jiggle Out of Machinery

Posted May 21, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

There's Jell-O and now there's Gell-Low. With its new series of anti-shock/anti-vibration mounts, Saelig hopes to satisfy the engineering community's hunger for reduced vibration and improved equipment stability. Gell-Low vibration isolators, made of recycled bovine byproducts, are compression-mounted to reduce vibration and shock in portable equipment, and protect moving parts from damage. While in use, the shock mounts actually emit aromas (strawberry/lime/liquorice) to mask unpleasant machine odors. And, according to a Saelig spokesperson, the Gello-Low isolators even serve as an emergency food source in a disaster situation.


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6 comments; last comment on 05/29/2015
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