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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Three-Wheeled Trucks and Model T Tanks

Posted July 27, 2010 12:01 AM by dstrohl

This two-man tank was designed by Charles H. Martin of Springfield, Massachusetts, the same inventor behind the Knox-Martin three-wheeled truck. As a tank, the Model T chassis (still powered by the Model T engine) would have carried 1,200 pounds of armor and two machine guns and would be capable of 12 MPH, making it ideal for "quick dashes into the enemy's country," Popular Science wrote in August 1918.

Interestingly, Popular Science also conjectured that in its final form, the Model T tank would use treads configured to go completely around the vehicle rather than straight forward and back. If Popular Science was correct, then Martin's tank in its final, armored form would have actually very closely resembled the Ford-built two-man tank.

Could Martin have been working with Ford at the time to develop his ideas for a tank? Or were the Martin two-man tank and the Ford two-man tank developed separately?

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