Plastics & Resins Blog Blog

Plastics & Resins Blog

The Plastics & Resins Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about polymers, films, foams, engineered components, green plastics, composites, mold making and anything else related to the plastics field. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Previous in Blog: Ditch It or Defend It?   Next in Blog: Once is Not Enough?
Close
Close
Close
8 comments

Profitable Plastics

Posted November 05, 2010 7:00 AM by Steve Melito

"There's a great future in plastics", Mr. McGuire told young Benjamin Braddock in The Graduate, a coming-of-age movie from 1967. Today, pressure-treated wood remains the most popular building material for decks and railings. Yet plastics still look promising. That's the word from Principia Partners, a strategic consulting firm for the construction materials industry.

From 2000 to 2005, pressure-treated lumber lost 12% of its share of the decking and railing marketplace, mainly because the construction industry weakened. Meanwhile, wood-plastic composite (WPC) products overcame problems with color fading, mildew, and staining to capture marginally more market share.

The real winner, however, may be ultra-low maintenance decking materials like capped polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Even during the current economic recession, suppliers who sold WPC decking with an outer capstock couldn't meet demand. Cellular PVC decking also looks promising - and profitable.

Do you see plastic decking in your backyard's future?

Sources: Plastics News and Principia Partners

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
2
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3989
Good Answers: 144
#1

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/06/2010 12:46 AM

plastic decking? only if I feel like standing on hot plastic in the sun.. which i don't..

then there's the cost ...many MANY times more than pt

then there's the look.. ...come on.. you can extrude only so much woody goodness into a piece of plastic..

I don't see these materials winding up as dining tables.. Why?

wood is the ultimate renewable resource. and it's naturally beautiful

I'd say save plastic lumber for industrial and commercial installations.. but I'd rather go with wood .. did I mention that wood is less slippery when wet!?

..oh.. and sawdust is superior in every possible way to.. well.. you guessed it..

__________________
High Tolerance is Beautiful
Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Guru

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 2142
Good Answers: 31
#2

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/07/2010 5:51 AM

I used it on the kitchen patio - looks good and zero maintenance in years to come.

No pitch bleeding out or any of that.

Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42296
Good Answers: 1662
#3

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/08/2010 3:42 PM

No one ever said, ""There's a great future in plastics" in The Graduate.

That's a fabrication and a misquote.

His admonition was a single word, "plastics".

Now, someday plastic flooring will be common place. It will take a combination of price increases of wood products and more "woodlike" properties of plastics.

I can't imagine walking of a wet deck made of plastics. Too slippery.

Reply
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - Don't Know What Made The Old Title Attractive... Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United States - US - Statue of Liberty - 60 Year Member

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Yellowstone Valley, in Big Sky Country
Posts: 6958
Good Answers: 282
#4

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/11/2010 12:58 PM

A plastic patio deck is like a fake turkey hot-dog. It is a fake, it looks fake, it tastes fake, and everybody knows it's fake.

Ultra low maintenance? I don't know about that. The burned spots on my neighbors fake deck (where coals dropped from the 'que) are pretty evident. They cannot be sanded or stained out, and he is too lazy to replace the boards... that is, after all, why he used plastic in the first place, believing it is ultra low maintenance.

__________________
When you come to a fork in the road, take it. (Yogiism)
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 2142
Good Answers: 31
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/11/2010 1:02 PM

To each his own - the shapes and surface texture are quite fine with me.

Not interested in teak or redwood - too expensive and I never have liked pine - too messy and looks ugly after a few years.

Actually, I don't think anyone is trying to fool anybody that it is wood.

Reply
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - Don't Know What Made The Old Title Attractive... Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United States - US - Statue of Liberty - 60 Year Member

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Yellowstone Valley, in Big Sky Country
Posts: 6958
Good Answers: 282
#6
In reply to #5

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/11/2010 1:29 PM

To each his own is correct, and I should have given you a little more.

I have lived nearly my entire life in the American mountain states of Idaho, Montana, Washington, and Wyoming. Timber and wood products are abundant and moderately priced (reasonable, anyway). So, I have a bias towards real wood that will be difficult to sway.

It seems the manufacturers feel that a wood appearance is beneficial. From this site:

"The look of a wood deck with smooth, soft, splinterless comfort", and "A deep, lush wood grain pattern in an eco-friendly material."

__________________
When you come to a fork in the road, take it. (Yogiism)
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 2142
Good Answers: 31
#7
In reply to #6

Re: Profitable Plastics

11/12/2010 12:40 AM

Similar here - born in Washington and grew up in Oregon. From the front windows of the house we had a great view of the snow caps of the Cascades. Loved being in the woods exploring. For a couple of summers during college I worked on skidding crews bringing out the monster ponderosa pines - beautiful trees.

However, most of the world does not have access to reasonable priced wood. My roof support beams are all steel profile - cost being one reason.

The texture and looks of the finish - all people really have to compare with is wood.

Reply
Member

Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 8
Good Answers: 1
#8
In reply to #5

Re: Profitable Plastics

12/02/2010 2:24 AM

try a tropical hardwood like jatopa, cumaru, ipe, tiger wood they also are expensive but last over twenty five years.CEW

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 8 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

CEW (1); Doorman (2); JE in Chicago (1); lyn (1); russ123 (3)

Previous in Blog: Ditch It or Defend It?   Next in Blog: Once is Not Enough?
You might be interested in: Floor Decking, Powder Coatings, Mining Tools

Advertisement