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Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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How Goodyear Helped Win the War

Posted February 03, 2011 9:00 AM by dstrohl

Pearl Harbor galvanized the country and sent it headlong into World War II. This we know. Just how everything changed – and so drastically – after that day is ripe for illustration. Alfred Palmer did a good job of that with his image at left, shot outside a large hangar at a Goodyear facility in Akron, Ohio, in December 1941. The following is from the caption for the image.

"Formerly an aircraft dock, this huge building — thought to be the largest in the world with no interior supports — is now the scene of many busy shops turning out aircraft sub-assembly parts, Goodyear Aircraft Corp., Akron, Ohio. Either new housing close to the plant or vastly improved public transportation will eventually have to be supplied, for the tires on the cars of the workers, and perhaps even the cars themselves, will in many instances give in before the end of the present emergency."

As one Hemmings reader commented, the photo is of the the Goodyear Airdock, built in 1929 by the Goodyear-Zeppelin Company as a factory for airships - blimps. The Moffet Field hangars (and similar ones in Weeksville, NC) were built shortly after to house the U.S. Airships Akron and Macon.

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Re: How Goodyear Helped Win the War

01/31/2011 1:38 PM

Believe it or not, the USS Akron was designed to be an aircraft carrier. Returning pilots sought to snag their biplanes on a cross-bar known as a "flying trapeze". As described in CR4's "On This Day in Engineering History" Blog, this device was first tested successfully on May 3, 1932.

Sadly, the Akron's successes were short-lived. Shortly after midnight on April 4, 1933, the airship was buffeted by ferocious winds off the coast of new Jersey. She sank tail first into the Atlantic, claiming the lives of 73 men.

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