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What is Engineering's Role in Infection Control?

Posted July 01, 2011 7:12 AM

Clearly, ASHE believes there is a role for healthcare engineers in infection control. But it is also not obvious what that role might be. So, what's the drill at your facility? How does the engineering function contribute to infection-control efforts in your shop? Is it doing enough? Is the contribution recognized?

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Re: What is Engineering's Role in Infection Control?

07/01/2011 2:54 PM

There are a couple of engineering challenges that spring to mind when it comes to infection control for the generic workplace setting: HVAC designs to prevent airborne infections, and antibacterial/virucidal surfaces for doorhandles - the entrance door is the classic place to get your seasonal flu.

Those engineering issues are even more significant in specific workplaces: where food is processed or handled, the work surfaces also; where sick people are taken care of; and last but not least the all-popular best-ever viral incubator, the primary school or daycare. Judicious use of antimicrobial surfaces and HVAC could probably have a significant impact on infection rates, especially if applied in these 'hot vector' settings. Or at least, it's important to try...

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Re: What is Engineering's Role in Infection Control?

07/02/2011 12:10 AM

Role of engineering department in a hospital is very crucial to maintain the standards as per the in e infection control department. Hospital engineer should be one of the members of the infection control committee which is usually chaired by a pathologists. They monitor various parameters as laid down by the international standards and take remedial action to keep all health care facilities free from infection.

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Re: What is Engineering's Role in Infection Control?

07/05/2011 3:56 PM

Along with what has already been mentioned with sanitizer dispensers being readily available in exam rooms and common patient areas where there is high traffic; we use HEPA filtering and also follow guidelines for the proper number of air exchanges for specific use areas. An ambulatory surgery area requires more air exchanges per hour than a waiting room for example. This is done by regulating the HVAC mechanics. We use an automated logic type system to monitor the mechanics of the HVAC system.

We also have a company that is certified to check for particulate count and air volume on a scheduled basis.

The accreditation organization that we have come in to check for quality control and patient care looks very closely at these and other means of infection control within our facility to ensure proper patient care in the best possible conditions.

We also have people in-house whose specific task it is to monitor processes internally to ensure proper quality control.

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