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Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

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Tech 101: How Metallurgy Makes a Better Automobile

Posted February 26, 2013 8:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: auto Manufacture metallurgy Tech 101

If you haven't gleaned it by now, these old Chevrolet sales films were meant less to provide comprehensive technical information and more to introduce the car-buying public to concepts and methods they didn't encounter on a day-to-day basis. (Thus the reason we're still on Tech 101 rather than moving on to the sophomore-level classes.) Still, it was pretty awesome that they trusted the general public to grasp certain concepts, such as how automakers use metallurgy to tailor certain alloys to certain tasks in an automobile, as this 1938 Jam Handy video, uploaded to YouTube by USAutoIndustry, shows.

Watch the video on Hemmings Daily.

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Re: Tech 101: How Metallurgy Makes a Better Automobile

02/27/2013 11:18 PM

And now word from the plastics industry who now makes most of our vehicles components. (Possibly from recycled plastic cutlery and soiled baby diapers.)

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