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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Project Wagoneer--Vacuum Sucks

Posted May 04, 2015 10:30 AM by dstrohl

Invariably, buying a used, high-mileage late-Seventies vehicle will result in one of life's biggest headaches: untangling the vacuum and emissions tubing rats' nest mess left behind by the previous owners. Straightening out those holiday light strings and nets that you just dumped into a box at the end of last winter is a dream compared to this task, mostly because you can just chuck the old lights and get some new ones next winter for a few bucks. Vacuum hoses you gotta sort out, so I figured I'd work through the mess on my recently purchased Wagoneer sooner rather than later.

I knew from driving around town that something just wasn't right with the four-barrel 360. See what was just wrong in the Wagoneer on Hemmings.

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Re: Project Wagoneer--Vacuum Sucks

05/05/2015 2:32 PM

Interesting read. I can relate well to the late 60's - early 90's carbureted type fuel systems and their quirks.

The first thing I always do is disconnect and block off the EGR.

Second is to remove the air pump and everything that went with it and block its feed port to the heads and or manifolds.

Third reduce the whole vacuum system down to 3 oto5 dedicated lines. The distributor, the PCV vent, brake booster, the heater controls if vacuum operated and the automatic transmission if equipped.

After that a basic rejetting of the carb is usually needed being to meet emissions standards back then they typically ran too lean so bumping them up one or two steps tend to substantially reduces overheating, driving bog and run on from high cylinder temps and counter intuitively enough the richening up tends to improve power performance and mileage on those ages of vehicles.

Now that said if you are unfortunate enough to have vehicle with the electronic carburetor system I do all the above plus replace the carb with a good aftermarket one of if it's a smaller 4 or 6 cyl engine refit an old 1950's or thereabouts industrial application carb with adjustable primary and secondary metering ability to the engine.

It always surprises people when they see all that crap removed and an old industrial carb sitting in a older vehicle. Rather impresses them too when they see a model that was well known for being a gutless underpowered fuel pig that was a total pain to work on get out and move and pull almost respectable MPG numbers while doing it.

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