Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Let's Give Some Appreciation to Canadian Car Brands

Posted June 27, 2022 7:01 AM by dstrohl

With all due respect to the professional drivers who keep our country’s commerce in motion, six hours is a long time on the highway. Associate Editor David Conwill and I were reminded of this when we made the trek from our Vermont office to Hershey, Pennsylvania, to conduct several photo shoots for upcoming features in Hemmings’ publications.

One subject was a 1974 International Model 100 pickup truck purchased by its current owner in 1980. As you’ll read in a future issue, the pickup — powered by an optional V-8 engine —was a daily driver until the tailgate fell off en route to Gettysburg; it would prove to be the beginning of a battle against rust during a decades-long restoration. Another vehicle we spent time with was a 1953 Mercury Monterey station wagon, thrust into the current owner’s hands by his pastor in 1983. Though a Chevrolet enthusiast, the owner squirreled away the Mercury for 30 years before it was given a sympathetic restoration.

In both cases, there was a lot more to their respective stories, and the finer details left David and I with something to discuss on the long trek home a few days later. Each of those vehicles is a comparatively rare sight today, with the pickup overcoming the ravages of rust and the Mercury escaping the "rat rod" movement unscathed. As we drove, the Monterey spurred other rarity discussions, such as the Canada-only Mercury Meteor.

The Meteor brand had been a strategic creation, blending Ford cars with Mercury trim and giving Canadian Mercury dealers a low-priced car line to sell. Similarly, Canadian Ford dealers received the upscale, Mercury-based Monarch. Both brands enjoyed varying degrees of success north of the border thanks in part to trim-level models within their ranks, such as the Montcalm (a name taken directly from military commander Louis-Joseph de Montcalm) and the Rideau, which was offered in at least three body styles through much of the Fifties. For the record, Rideau is French for "curtain" and is the name of a canal that connects Ottawa, the Canadian capital, to Lake Ontario.

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