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Conversion From g/mol to eq/l ???

02/26/2018 2:36 AM

Could you advise the conversion of H+ from g/mol (Mr 1.01g/mol) to eq/l (N, normality)? The normality of H+ is around 7.94E-09.

I am wondering how to convert from Mr to N.

Thanks.

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#1

Re: Conversion from g/mol to eq/l ???

02/26/2018 2:40 AM

Sure. There is a page in Wikipedia on this topic.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Conversion from g/mol to eq/l ???

02/26/2018 7:43 AM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equivalent_concentration

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#3

Re: Conversion From g/mol to eq/l ???

02/26/2018 9:06 AM

I suppose Mr is what I call atomic mass (or weight). The figure 1.01 is about right for hydrogen.

There's no direct connection between Mr and N. Mr is constant for a given substance, N depends on concentration.

In general (not just hydrogen) you need the concentration in g/l. Divide by the atomic, ionic or molecular mass to get gram-atoms, gram-ions or gram-mols/l. Divide by valency to get g-eq/l (or normality). For hydrogen, valency = 1.

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