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Printing in Metal

10/05/2019 8:19 AM

I am a manufacturer of Silver ornaments . They are filled with wax and stones where heating will not be possible . I want to print my initials on the metal side of jewels. kindly inform is there any way to do it. the text height I want is 3 mm and 10 mm long .

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#1

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/05/2019 10:11 AM

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#10
In reply to #1

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 10:57 PM

Thanks for reply. But here the metal plate thickness will be 2mm only. So embossing cannot be done.

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#15
In reply to #10

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/09/2019 8:20 AM

2 mm is an extremely heavy gauge to use for the back plate of the items you pictured. To suggest that this sheet is too thin for stamping is completely absurd.

See the chart here for conversion to gauges and weights:

https://www.hooverandstrong.com/flat-sheet-specifications

A 2 mm backplate would weigh nearly half a troy ounce per square inch. Unless your client is a rhinoceros, the weight of the pictured item would be like a millstone.

As I commented below, there is nothing to prevent you from stamping metal sheet of any gauge down to 0.2 mm, if that's what you meant to say. To avoid excess deformation or tearing, make sure the metal is properly supported from below with a hard work surface, and be moderate in the amount of force used.

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#18
In reply to #10

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/21/2019 7:10 AM

Nonsense.

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#2

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/05/2019 12:33 PM

Laser engraving

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#8
In reply to #2

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 10:53 PM

thanks. I try it

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#3

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/05/2019 1:13 PM

No heating is required to put identifying marks on metal. The standard procedure is as SolarEagle said. The back of the metal is stamped before your bezels are attached and your stones are mounted. If you are the manufacturer of these products, you would likely understand that it has to happen at an early stage of the fabrication process, as it cannot be done once the bezels are in place.

Precision engraving may be possible after the fact, but it will have a different look cw a stamp. There is always a risk in putting pressure on your settings. There is also a risk of slipping and scratching on a highly finished and hardened surface - again - finishing and hardening the back and other parts is a step that is accomplished before you set your stones.

Cut your back sheet - stamp - attach bezels- finish and completely polish the metal front and back - last of all mount the stones. That is the necessary order of business.

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#11
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Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 11:01 PM

thanks for reply. As I replied to SolarEagle the metal thickness will not be enough for stamping. IF there is no other option I have to follow your idea only. Still I am searching for any permanant ink priniting.

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#14
In reply to #11

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/09/2019 7:44 AM

Metal of any thickness can be stamped. The thinner the metal, the less force required to make your stamp, and that is the only adjustment required. Anyone working in silver metal would know this.

Maker's marks and metal content are always stamped. The fact that the marks are made early in the process provides a guarantee of authenticity that any knowledgeable person can recognize. Engraved marks are ownership marks. They are made on finished items. No one would accept for example, a metal content mark that was added to a finished item by engraving. Using "permanent ink" to make your mark on finished pieces is no different, it raises questions of authenticity which anyone in the industry would recognize. Many consumers will also recognize that marking metal with ink simply cheapens the piece and raises doubts about quality.

As SE pointed out, stamped tags or linked blanks may be attached to the piece next to the clasp to identify maker or metal content. This is normally done only when the surface area of the back metal is too small to mark, or for chains and other items which have no surface to stamp.

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#4

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/05/2019 6:57 PM
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#9
In reply to #4

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 10:55 PM

Thanks for reply. But it cannot be dipped into solution since the gold foil cover will loosed its finishing.

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#5

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/05/2019 8:51 PM

While my first thought was to laser engrave, that is significant cost for the equipment and training.

For smaller business, you might be able to mask the surface and "sand blast etch" the detail that you need. I seem to remember someone here using "rubber" masks for that sort of work as the rubber survives the process for multiple uses.

Another option (since you are into jewelry) might be to create you mark as an enamel fused onto the items.

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#12
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Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 11:08 PM

Thanks for Reply. my jewels made of silver and electroplated with gold in base and all around except top. Top portion covered with stone and gold foils. the limitation here is the ornament does not withstand any force and cannot be dipped into solution. So enamel coating is difficult in this process. Now im looking for any permanant ink printing

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#6

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/06/2019 12:19 AM

Have you thought of simply etching the initials.?

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#7
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Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 10:52 PM

yes , but etching damages the wax and stone

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#13
In reply to #7

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/08/2019 11:56 PM

I've seen a lot of jewelry designers just use a custom tag usually attached to the chain clasp...

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#16
In reply to #13

Re: Priniting in Metal

10/09/2019 5:45 PM

Ran across this...not really a solution here, but interesting just the same....

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#17

Re: Printing in Metal

10/10/2019 2:37 AM

Another option would be to use "Tampon printing" methodology.

The ink is a 2 part epoxy that is prepared and then squeegeed into a shallow pattern in a flat plate.

The tampon is a Teflon shaped pad that will pick the ink from the patterned plate.

When that is applied to the product, the ink transfers onto the product.

Typically used to print things like keyboard keys and decals on automotive switches and such and especially things like golf balls with irregular surfaces.

The beauty of that system is that the ink will transfer onto curved and irregular surfaces with repeatable ease and drying time once deposited is minutes. The challenge is that the inks are expensive and once mixed will cure in a few hours.

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