Previous in Forum: Please HELP me..   Next in Forum: Sizing pneumatic cylinders
Close
Close
Close
5 comments
Anonymous Poster

American Welding Terminology - "G"

02/18/2008 9:53 AM

does anyone know what a G in a circle attached to a drawing describing welding positions and sizes mean?? thanks

Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Active Contributor
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Umm Qasr Naval Base, Umm Qasr, Iraq, i have returned to Sonoma Ca effective 7/12/07
Posts: 16
#1

Re: American Welding Terminology - "G"

02/18/2008 12:16 PM

hello,

I am not an engineer but have worked on a lot of pipelines, jet fuel tank farms and pumpstations over the years.

1G would be pipe welded on a roll out wheel at approximately 1 pm on the clock.

2G is a horizontal weld if memory serves me correctly,

5G is a weld in place in the ditch,

6G is a weld at a 45 degree angle done in place and is the most difficult test to take and the one we most generally insist on.

To the best of my knowledge pipe size is not an sort of influence over the position, usually most welded steel under 2" is with socket weld couplings and considered a fillet weld.

If you go to the AWS web site you can probably get more information.

Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Manufacturing Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member United States - Member - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Charlotte, NC USA
Posts: 782
Good Answers: 17
#2

Re: American Welding Terminology - "G"

02/18/2008 3:24 PM

That is the finish Symbol (user's standard) indicates method of obtaining specified contour but not a degree of finish. "G" is also used as a process specification.

__________________
Be careful of what you wish for .....
Reply
4
Guru
Engineering Fields - Piping Design Engineering - New Member Egypt - Member - Member since 02/18/2007

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cairo, Egypt
Posts: 1734
Good Answers: 244
#3

Re: American Welding Terminology - "G"

02/19/2008 2:11 AM

G = Groove weld (butt weld).

The american codes and standards such as ASME and AWS classify the welding joints into 5 types : B = Butt weld, C = Corner, E = Edge, L = Lap and T = Tee.

The same codes classify the welding positions into: F = Fillet weld and G = Groove weld (butt weld):

Fillet welds, F : 1F = Flat position, 2F = Horizontal position, 3F = Vertical position, and 4F = Overhead position.

Groove welds, G : 1G = Flat position, 2G = Horizontal position, 3G = Vertical position, 4G = Overhead position, 5G = Pipe shall not be turned or rolled while welding axis of pipe horizontal, and 6G = Inclined axis with pipe stationary.

The groove welds are : Single V, Single U, Double V, Double U, Single beveled, Single J, Duble beveled, and Double J.

__________________
It is better to be defeated on principles, than to win on lies!
Reply Good Answer (Score 4)
Anonymous Poster
#5
In reply to #3

Re: American Welding Terminology - "G"

09/07/2010 11:13 PM

Thanks so much for your information

kindly explaining for me about 1F,2F,3F,4F,PF,PB and Can 6G weld for all position like flat,horizontal, vertical, overhead position? I don't understand about this

I hope that you will respond for me soon

My email : minhtrivt02@yahoo.com

Once again Thanks very much and Best Regards.

Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Participant

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: NIGDI,PUNE,INDIA
Posts: 1
#4

Re: American Welding Terminology - "G"

02/19/2008 3:17 AM

"G" stands for the design of the weld joint / weld end i.e Groove also F for the fillet weld joint.

I hope it clears your understanding.

Reply
Reply to Forum Thread 5 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Abdel Halim Galala (1); Anonymous Poster (1); Labyguy (1); paragpan (1); RickinIRaq (1)

Previous in Forum: Please HELP me..   Next in Forum: Sizing pneumatic cylinders

Advertisement