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Join Date: May 2009
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Fan Loads

05/19/2009 6:20 AM

hey.. what is the load of a fan? Can a fan run in vaccuum? i'm a beginner in electricals.. explain me pls?

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#1

Re: load of a fan

05/19/2009 6:24 AM

1. The load on a fan is the pneumatic one + the losses.

2. The fan can run in vacuum assuming you mean an electric fan - but

a) No air to displace hence it is not a fan

b) The losses can not be dissipated (no cooling air) hence the fan will quickly fail due to over heat.

3. These are not electrical question and are more of a mechanical (Fluid mechanics) and Heat+thermodynamics

4. Of course it is a bit rude, but the first word could have been rephrased.

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#2

Re: load of a fan

05/19/2009 6:26 AM

The power needed for any fluid mover is the increase in pressure times the volumetric flowrate, all expressed in compatible units.

A hypothetical fan running in a vacuum, therefore, will have no pressure change and no volumetric flowrate, as there is no fluid to move. So the power needed, apart from that required to overcome seal and bearing resistance, will be zero.

The concept of wanting to run a fan in a vacuum, however, is awe-inspiring....

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: load of a fan

05/19/2009 7:37 AM

The concept of wanting to run a fan in a vacuum, however, is awe-inspiring....

I'm a big fan of the concept
It will help to keep the vacuum cool
Del

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