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chainsaw oiler question

12/30/2009 5:38 PM

We own a small chainsaw, Sears model 358.357181, serial # 1G311E410. It seems not to have an oil pump, has a small plate beneath the bar, that has a filter, and a 'check valve ?' with the oiler tube going directly to the oiler hole behind the bar. The oil tube was blown clear by air, seems good. The 'check valve?' allows air one way, toward the oil tube, and not the other way, but we do not get oiling of the bar, none comes out. How does it acheive oiling, or does it have a pump? It appears to be gravity-fed. We replaced the bar oil with 30-wt oil, same results.

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#1

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/30/2009 6:05 PM

Some saws use a little pressure from the engine to push oil out to the bar.

I'm no expert, but you might consider this. My saw mechanic (I know my limitations) told me to always open the oil tank cap, when I was done cutting for the day, to relieve the pressure inside. That made my Poulan quit leaking so much chain oil into the case.

Maybe I'm the only one on the planet who didn't know this already.

I hope that you are manually oiling the bar now?

Good Luck!

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#2

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/31/2009 7:18 AM

All of the chainsaws I have used are oiled by manually pumping - pushing on the cap with your thumb.

In both my saws, the oil input is a screwcap on the top. Push down on the closed cap with your thumb while holding the saw in an ordinary two handed grip for use. There should be mechanical pumping action by pushing on that cap. The saw does not have to be running for this to work.

With the saw turned off, grasp the chain after pumping and slide the chain back and forth around the bar to test that it is oiled and moving smoothly. Check your tension at the same time by pulling the chain away from the bar on the side. The teeth should not quite clear the bar - if they do it is too loose and should be tightened before use.

It is proper procedure to fill the oil reservoir, close the cap, pump to oil, test chain for free movement and tension before you turn on the saw, every time you use it.

I'd be very surprised if the oiling procedure isn't clearly described in the manual - it is essential for safe operation of a chain saw to keep it continually oiled!! You need to give that cap a good push every few minutes while using, to keep the chain oiled.

Do be careful, and have a safe new year.

Cheers.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/31/2009 8:40 AM

I don't know how old your saws are, but I've had 6-8 new saws in the last 5 years and NONE of them had manual oilers. Absolutely no way to oil the chain except to apply oil from a can to the chain, or start the saw.

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/31/2009 9:14 AM

Yes, it is old. I removed the small check valve this morning, and now oil does come out the oiler hole, but may use too much now, anxious to try it, but hate to wake the neighbors yet. I guess this was a step up from the old manual oilers, and a cheap way for getting by without a pump. Thank you for your replys.

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#5
In reply to #3

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/31/2009 10:49 AM

I guess if the engine drives the oil pumping, that's a step up from the hand operated scene. Make it automatic, less room for error! One of the reasons I don't use the saw much any more, I find after about an hour or less I can no longer keep my grip. The manual oiling is part of that, whatever it is that wears me out and leaves my hands pretty useless for a while.

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: chainsaw oiler question

12/31/2009 12:18 PM

Yep,

After I fill gas and oil tanks, I start the saw, place the chain/bar tip about 3 inches off the ground and rev the saw. If the oiler is working properly, you will see oil droplets all over the ground under the tip of the bar after just a few seconds. If no oil mist, shut it off and clear the lines.

I can't go an hour straight and consider myself safe. I do it very rarely. My 67 year old brother can run one for hours. But, he lives in central AR and heats his house with wood he cuts.

Cheers.

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#7

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 12:05 AM

This is a timely and much appreciated question. I've a much treasured 1993 600 CC Honda VLX Shadow and I've been trying to develop an automatic chain oiler. Thanks to all who responded as you expanded my alternatives.

L.J.

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#8

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 9:41 AM

Thanks for the great responses. Now, does anyone have an idea as to a 'good' compression figure for a chainsaw. Is 25 psi enough, or do we need overhaul. I suspect mix was lean, now will not start. Fire is strong.

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#11
In reply to #8

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 1:16 PM

Hi Big John Mac,

25 PSI is WAY low! Should be at least 80-90 PSI.

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#12
In reply to #11

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 1:35 PM

Squirt some oil in the spark plug hole and check it again.

Should be higher than 25.

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#9

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 10:35 AM

I've used chainsaws for about 30 years. both with manual and automatic oilers. I've never had a problem with oil getting to the bar. Some years I have cut as much 20 cords of wood in a season. One thing I did find out was that my saws worked real good with a 10W oil. Seems that is close to what bar oil is. I have used waste transmission fluid, waste synthetic rotary compressor oil (about a 15W-18W) ISO46), and anything else in the viscosity range as long as it was clean.. As I said never a problem with oil getting to bar or oilers.

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 11:25 AM

I took up mineral oil instead of the pink stuff, after I read about it being used as a chain oil in some mycology research. The guys put spores of some delicious Oyster mushroom into the mineral oil, used it to oil the chain, and go cut logs to inoculate them. It worked, apparently, and seeded their stumps for a crop of food.

The mineral oil seems to work well? as a chain oil. Is that a 10W oil or close? Just wondering.

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#13

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/01/2010 6:48 PM

I have a Stihl 025 about 5-7 years old. It does not seem to oil right to me - but I bought it used so i don't know what is oiled like new. I get about a half to a third of a tank of oil used per tank of gas, and the chain is always drier than any other saw I have ever used. My father and chain saw mentor always told me that they should use a full tank of chain oil per tank of gas if they are working right.

However, I have been using a good synthetic (Amsoil) bar and chain oil in it for 3 years with it running this way and I have not had any chain failure or problems. Any thoughts or suggestions on how to fix it. I don't want to run this way forever, but I can't seem to fix it, either. I have tried every year, and when I think I got it fixed, it just goes back to running "lean" with no visible ill effects.

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#14

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/02/2010 2:36 AM

Hello Big John Mac, Here the Sears site to your saw. I believe the saw has a pump for what you are calling a check valve from looking at the diagram main frame. Part # 7, part #21, part #15-19. With pn#16 pump cover, pn#17 pump gasket, pn#18 oil filter,pn# 19 metering body assy.

Although it looks like some parts are no longer available from sears.

I hope this helps.

Charles

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#15
In reply to #14

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/02/2010 9:14 AM

Charles, thank you so much for the diagram. Then right after I removed the center valve from part # 19, and was trying to see if oiling, then bearing #23 siezed up! so did not finish testing. And thanks to all who have tried to help. John

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#16
In reply to #15

Re: chainsaw oiler question

01/02/2010 1:24 PM

OUCH! If you follow the sears link you should be able to find some of the parts you would need. The rest could most likely be found at a good small engine shop.They usually know what interchanges. Sears had a habit of contracting there store brand from other mfgs.

That is if you were not looking for an excuse to get a new saw.

Charles

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