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visual basic

02/16/2007 10:20 PM

what is visual basic?????

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#1

Re: visual basic

02/17/2007 12:39 AM

Visual Basic is a programming language developed by Microsoft.

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#2

Re: visual basic

02/18/2007 12:58 AM

Visual BASIC is a programming language that is used to develop Windows based applications. The instructions you use are along the lines of the usual BASIC one come across but it has additional tools for creating and manipulating the GUI (graphical user interface) that Windows uses.

Visual BASIC is also structured vastly differently. A normal BASIC program will consist of a series of subroutines that are called from a main program that controls the flow of information and logic. In other words the program is executed in a sequential order. Visual BASIC is however an event driven system where the program is constructed from many subroutines that are executed when given events take place. For example you may have a button on a screen labeled YES. This button would have several subroutines associated with them that are executed for example when the button is left clicked, right clicked, double clicked, pointed to, selected, dragged, dropped, etc. The end result is that you have a multitude of small subroutines that are called by Windows when certain events occur within the operating system.

There are several versions of the Visual compilers for example there is a Visual C compiler that uses C as the basis rather than BASIC. The Visual part refers to the fact that it is a Windows based program that can be used to create a Windows based event driven application. The Visual compilers are very powerful tools and while not perfect can make developing a Windows application a relatively straight forward task.

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#4
In reply to #2

Re: visual basic

03/18/2007 9:03 PM

This will crack you up - I've used QBASIC for years (and dabbled with Pascal ) but do not find VB in any way intuitive. What is the best resource/book you've seen on the subject. Your definition of 'intuitive' may be different to mine , but I'm interested . VB seems to sidestep the logic (which I enjoy ) of BASIC . I haven't found anything I can't do (well that I'd want to do) on QBASIC , but it isn't very pretty for an end user.

By way of anecdote , I hold a sneaking admiration for a guy I met not that many years ago who would use Holorythic (not sure of spelling) cards -honest , he did ! .

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: visual basic

03/23/2007 2:24 AM

Hi Kris,

Bite you tongue, I used punch cards back in my early days of programming and I'm not that old. I can remember sitting down at a hand punch for hours encoding my programs. You could get yourself into serious trouble if you dropped a box of 1,000 cards. Later I used a variation that used photo-sensors that could read cards marked with pencil, so you didn't need to punch a hole. However, the principal was exactly the same and the cards were otherwise identical. Later on we used blank cards to polish the heads in hard disk drives that had crashed. If you managed to shut the drive down fairly quickly you could usually salvage about half the heads this way. With 20 heads in a drive and at $1,000 a head it was worth the effort.

By the way it's spelt Hollerith and if you follow the link it will give you a history of the punch card.

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: visual basic

03/23/2007 3:09 AM

I remember the amazement on peoples faces when the first pocket calculators appeared . Not as much fun as trying to jam one of those hand cranked machines.

Didn't realise Hollerith was a New Yorker . Does he deserve credit ? I suppose so , since I don't think Jacquard can claim it either.

ps - my spelling is lousy , and spell-checker doesn't always bail me out. I should stop being so lazy ! Kris.

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: visual basic

03/23/2007 3:47 AM

I believe the use of punch cards for computers goes all the way back to Babbage. While he never built any of his programmable computers I remember reading that he planned to use punched cards to feed data into the machines.

There is a certain amount of dispute over what the first digital computer actually was but Colossus was one of the very early contenders. It didn't used punch cards but rather punch tape, but the principal is really the same.

I can certainly remember working on paper tape readers and punches and it wasn't just confined to computers. Telex machines also used paper tape to encode the message prior to transmission.

The first computer that I had access to was an IBM-360 back in the early 1970s. The actual machine that I used is now in the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney. If you ever have the opportunity I suggest visiting it. Unfortunately they only have room to display less than 5% of what they have. You can by prior arrangement go on a tour of their entire collection but these tours are limited an only happen once a month.

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: visual basic

03/23/2007 6:39 AM

As I understand , the 'Difference Engine' had cogs etc and was preset for individual tables . I guess that's programmable in a loose sense . Poor old Colossus (and blueprints) got junked . "Who made the first programmable computer" is a hot potato.

I had been thinking about music boxes (where the software is a changeable drum )!

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: visual basic

03/23/2007 8:04 AM

"As I understand , the 'Difference Engine' had cogs etc and was preset for individual tables . I guess that's programmable in a loose sense."

Babbage went on after the difference engine to design the next logical step. It was a machine that could be programmed from the punched cards as well as using them for the input of data. Like just about everything Babbage did he never finished it and it was never built.

The concept however was pretty much the same as the early computers. You had two basic types of cards, program cards and data cards. Most people used different coloured cards to differentiate between the two. The idea was that you would bundle up all the cards with the program cards first then stack all the data cards behind the program cards. You then feed the whole stack into the computer which then reads the program, runs the program and then feeds the data in that needs processing. At the completion of a run you take the program cards back for use later and do whatever needed to be done with the data cards. It was the origin of batch processing and the batch process manager was the person that decided which pile of cards got fed through the machine next.

"Who made the first programmable computer" is a hot potato.

"I had been thinking about music boxes (where the software is a changeable drum )!"

If you look at it from the point of a machine that could be programmed to perform specific tasks according to the program then the Jacquard loom in 1801 predates the music box in 1815.

When it comes to being able to perform calculations according to a set of easily changed rules then it starts to get messy.

Since we are talking about computers you might like to see this photograph. It arrived in an e-Mail with the question

Do you know what this is?

I had actually seen one before so the sender was considerably surprised when I informed hi that it was actually and early IBM disk drive. It is circa 1953 and had a capacity of 5 MB.

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: visual basic

03/24/2007 2:58 AM

Thanks for all the info masu . That picture is brilliant . At the time , that hard drive must have seemed fantastic (well I guess it was ). Kris

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#3

Re: visual basic

02/19/2007 1:10 PM

Wikipedia can give you something?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_Basic

Try it!

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