Previous in Forum: Gravity= Energy   Next in Forum: Voltage Drop Calculation for Single Phase
Close
Close
Close
14 comments
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bristol, Tennessee
Posts: 1176
Good Answers: 57

Current From Static Electricity

01/26/2011 6:21 PM

I am researching a project that creates a lot of static electricity, airflow over a large surface(see avatar). Is there any way to utilize this potential? Usually aircraft just bleed off the charge, but I want to put it to use, like charging a battery. I can have multiple layers, with dielectric between them if necessary. A big flying capacitor.

__________________
mike k
Register to Reply
Pathfinder Tags: Static electricity
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire, UK. Going under cover.
Posts: 9684
Good Answers: 467
#1

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/26/2011 7:01 PM

Try to estimate how much charge is accumulated (in Coulombs).

You need a lot to get an appreciable current flowing for a reasonable time.

See e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_current

__________________
"Love justice, you who rule the world" - Dante Alighieri
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: In the Ozark woods in missouri.
Posts: 106
Good Answers: 3
#8
In reply to #1

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 10:37 AM

I don`t remember the date, but I do remember the man. Art Bell of radio talk show fame had a loop antenna at I believe 75 feet out at his home in the desert. They were doing some modifications on it when they got a shock. Putting a volt meter in line they saw that they had 300 volts DC current. This was caused by the air flow over the wire he was using for his antenna.I have 3700 feet of wire in a loop configuration at about 40 feet, but I have never checked it for DC voltage. I should, since I have two battery banks to charge up. This was one of those projects that got put on hold cause of other more important things going on. Now that I have my 8,000 watt inverter hooked up and using it, I should get back to this little experiment. Thanks for reminding me to do this, and you might want to Google Art Bells web site. I believe he talked about this exstensively. Have a good day, and I hope this builds your confidence to keep trying.Seems like Art was trying to figure a way to charge his batteries off this wire also.

__________________
Life is tough, but it`s tougher if your stupid, John Wayne.
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
4
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Power Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: California, USA, where the Godless live next door to God.
Posts: 4660
Good Answers: 796
#10
In reply to #8

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 7:13 PM

Voltage does not equal power.

Current does not equal power.

Voltage AND current equals power.

Voltage AND Current AND Time equals energy.

300VDC x 0.01ma = 0.003W. If it all discharges in 0.1 second, the resulting energy is still not enough to reasonably depict without scientific notation.

In other words, insignificant.

A much more significant source of energy is a "Cat Generator". Not the type sold by Caterpillar Corp. mind you, a much more ingenious device.

  • We all know that buttered toast always falls with the butter side down.
  • We all know that cats always land on their feet.
  • If we simply strap a slice of buttered toast to the back of a cat and devise a way to connect a power take off to its tail, dropping the cat from a table sets in motion an endless rotation of the cat, trying to land on its feet, and the buttered toast trying to land butter side down.
  • This could potentially solve ALL of the energy problems of the world!
__________________
** All I every really wanted to be, was... A LUMBERJACK!.**
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 4)
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bristol, Tennessee
Posts: 1176
Good Answers: 57
#11
In reply to #10

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 9:46 PM

I just read some articles by William J Beaty, and apparently I'm not going to get any power from static electricity. Darn, I really was hoping for some free energy. He refers to static as an imbalance of charge, but not the kind that can be tapped for useful purposes. Just high voltage sitting there. His best argument was that a wire can be carrying current while simultaneously having a static charge. Or not. AArgh.

__________________
mike k
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 277
Good Answers: 45
#2

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/27/2011 10:46 PM

I confidently predict that you will get no useful electrical power (as in watts), including at reasonable cost, from attempting to harness static electricity.

But since you did mention flying, then a useful application for your static (presumably high voltage) electricity would to use it to power of those Bifeld-Brown (or Tim Ventura) Lifter devices.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hyderabad, India
Posts: 596
Good Answers: 12
#3

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/27/2011 11:04 PM

If this is somehow made possible then, we can tap lightening electrical energy also!

__________________
Subramanyam
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: West Coxsackie, NY
Posts: 533
Good Answers: 10
#4

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 12:04 AM

There is no way you can harness the tiny bits of static to produce any useful usage from it. There is just no way to harness it to use it. It is a micro volt in the time span of millisecond.

Now if you can greate a static generator that can produce amps and proper voltage, well then you would be creating a generator. If you tried to build this in your garage or basement, well, it would be cheaper to buy a diesel genset to power your house and may not be as much fun. But would "cost" you big time. (Hey, I am still working on a perpetual generator, but don't tell anyone, they will put me back in the padded room again, so keep thie between us).

__________________
"Real Bass Players" do not use picks
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 442
Good Answers: 32
#9
In reply to #4

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 4:32 PM

Jim,

Voltages are typically in the 10,000 V range and up for shuffling across a carpet. But you are right, current and time are tiny.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 4)
Guru

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: West Coxsackie, NY
Posts: 533
Good Answers: 10
#12
In reply to #9

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 10:36 PM

That is exactly what I was referring to. You may have 10,000-20,000 volts @ .00001A for .002 seconds. Just enough for a zap. (Pretty Blue Flame). Then skuffle across the carpet again. I have been working on many different generator designs of self propulsion. Let me stop you there now, I'm not a quack. (Circa 1970) Yet. I designed the tail fan for Sikorsky back in the 70's. So, "I know a little", (Lynard Skynard, 1977). Anyways that was my point in bringing this to the table. Static charge has little to offer in the way to create energy. Except that pretty blue flame.

Otherwise, Tesla, Westinghouse, Franklin, Edison would have expounded on it in a heart beat several years back and life wold be much different than it is today.

__________________
"Real Bass Players" do not use picks
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 4)
Anonymous Poster
#5

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 9:33 AM

I wonder how many told Tesla, Marconi or Edison he couldn't do it. :-D Go for it and good luck Mike. (Don't bet the farm on it. Get investors.)

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Anonymous Poster
#6

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 9:55 AM

Hey, Mike.

When I was in school, I built a circuit using op-amps to magnify a noise signal up to a readable voltage on my multimeter. Of course, in my naivete, I didn't realize it was just a noise signal until later on.

I was so impressed with this, I decided one day I would try it again with other low voltage signals when I had the time. I am still waiting for the time.

Anyway, I am with you 100%. Don't let the "experts" tell you it can't be done.

VM

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 511
Good Answers: 46
#7

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/28/2011 9:56 AM

John Galt would know.

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Malanda, Australia
Posts: 117
Good Answers: 1
#13

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/29/2011 4:09 AM

Dear Mike, I suspect you may have an Electret situation on your wing, QUESTION What is an Electret. ANSWER A solid electrically insulating, or dielectric, material that has acquired a long-lasting electrostatic polarization. Electrets are produced by heating certain dielectric materials to a high temperature and then letting them cool while immersed in a strong electric field. An electret is an analog of a permanent magnet." Early electret experiments used Coax, - heated in a magnetic field, - basically it absorbs ions out of the air, - more effective in windy moist situations, and early researchers such as Paul Clint used Spark plugs, - yes Spark plugs, like out of a car to try and control the massive and variable flow, - ultimately trying to use it to charge batteries. Very little has been done with this info, an interesting link to the genesis of some of this is below, - it is not free energy, not free lunch, but catching charged ions. http://www.esdjournal.com/static/shower/shower.html Cheers, Geoff Thomas.

__________________
Let's try and think clearly when looking at information and only allow emotions when weighing up options.
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
2
Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 442
Good Answers: 32
#14

Re: Current From Static Electricity

01/29/2011 9:47 AM

Even a small table-top Van de Graaff generator can generate 300,000 volts at 30 microamps. That 9 watts. Not much, but not trivial. I would assume that your setup creates at least this amount of static.

Van de Graaff generators are not just toys, they do real work like supplying the high voltages for accelerators etc. This is what they are good at.

So there is usable power, but the problem is the voltage. There may be some way to step this voltage down to some usable level, but it is not trivial, and would not seem practical.

I've come across at least one website that shows a guy trying to step-down a Van de Graaff generator. It was on one of the "alternative energy" sites. It looked like he had achieved some success, but as is typical, it sure was not clear.

My feeling is that there is probably some way to get some useful work out, at usable voltages. I also feel that there would be tremendous losses in the conversion and you don't have that much power to begin with.

I would look at the articles on van de Graaff generators and other electrostatic machines. While it does not seem practical to convert to usable voltages, you may find a high voltage application that is useful (or just fun) to you.

Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Register to Reply 14 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Anonymous Poster (2); Jimh77 (2); JohnDG (1); JRaef (1); kvsubramanyam (1); Lookfar (1); mike k (1); rcrain (1); RufusVS (1); Tad (2); TrevorM (1)

Previous in Forum: Gravity= Energy   Next in Forum: Voltage Drop Calculation for Single Phase

Advertisement